Category Archive: Haunted Locations

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Apr 27

Northern State Mental Hospital

Lillee Allee

Lillee Allee

Representative at National Paranormal Society
Lillee Allee has studied religion, spirituality and paranormal investigation for over 40 years. She is the widow of John D. Allee, an internationally known dark magician. She continues to consult in paranormal investigation. Her specialties include: Marian and cultural spiritual phenomena/apparitions, spiritual support to teams and clients who want spiritual counseling after investigation, evp work and old school audio, the accuracy and research of past life regression and seance, and spiritual protection. Lillee was also one of the first to incorporate trained canines into paranormal investigations. She hosts a radio program on the para-x.com network, Happy Mediums, with Debra Ann Freeman, who also consults with paranormal investigative teams in Southern New England. Lillee is a published author and journalist, and legal clergy with degrees in psychology and mass communication. Lillee walks on the middle path sees learning as a life-long endeavor and is looking to make a difference and contribution to this field before she too will be heard on someone’s EVP. Lillee is always available to educate and consult and continues to enjoy guesting on other’s radio and television programs.
Lillee Allee

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Northern State Mental Hospital (also known as Northern State Hospital for the Insane and Northern State Hospital for the Criminally Insane)
Sedro-Woolley, Washington State
By: Lillee Allee

Northern State Mental Hospital, near Sedro-Woolley, was built in 1912 due to the overcrowding at the two asylums in the region. This cottage plan was designed so the institution could be be self-sufficient and to offer therapeutic work for the patients. The first homicide of one patient by another offered in February 1922.Throughout its history, the actual diagnoses were questionable as patients were placed in the hospital by well-meaning and perhaps not so well-meaning family members. Deaths occurred due to such reasons as excessive labor, electroshock therapy, and lobotomies. Though many felt that the name “the Bughouse” as it was locally known was a derogative term, Bugtown was actually the name of the area before the asylum was ever built. By the 1950s, the facility housed 2,700 residents, which was its full capacity. The hospital was closed in 1973. There were 1,500 unmarked burials in cemetery, and at its closing, 204 containers of cremated remains were found in the morgue. These were later buried in Mount Vernon at the Hawthorne Cemetery.

Part of the complex is used as a Job Corps office and a drug treatment center. Some of the building have been torn down or condemned so trespassing would be a dangerous as well as illegal behavior.

Hauntings reportedly include a little girl playing with a ball, a man who seems to follow her, and a nurse who is pushing a male patient in a wheelchair. In 2006, a paranormal group got permission to investigate and caught some compelling evidence on film.

Sources
http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/washington/wa-haunted/
http://www.skagitriverjournal.com/NearbyS…/…/NSH1-Intro.html
http://www.weirdus.com/…/…/northern_state_hospital/index.php
http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/northern-state-ghost-town

Lillee Allee's photo.

Sep 02

Houska Castle, Czech Republic

Deb Daniel Jansons

Deb Daniel Jansons

Assistant Director / Haunted Locations at National Paranormal Society
I am Deb Daniel Jansons. I was born and raised in the Huntsville, Al area, but lived in Ontario, Canada for 12 years, before coming back home to be with my grandson. I have had an interest in the paranormal since I was a small child and had my first experience. I love going out to places that are known to have strange things happen, but I always look for an explanation of anything that might happen when I am there and take nothing at face value. I also love to read anything that I can get my hands on concerning the paranormal and other people’s experiences. One of my hopes is that the day will come, during my lifetime that we will have absolute proof that there are spirits, aliens, etc out there. Until then, all we can do is investigate and hope.
Deb Daniel Jansons

Latest posts by Deb Daniel Jansons (see all)

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Approximately 47km from Prague, sits a large and menacing structure called the Houska Castle. It is believed that this was ordered to be built by Otto Karll of Bohemia, who reigned as ruler from 1253-1278. Sometime later this building began passing from one aristocratic member to another, until it stopped being used as a noble residence in the 18th Century and began to fall into a state of disrepair. It was renovated in 1823 and in 1897 was purchased by Princess Hohenloke and then again in 1924, by Skoda President, Josef Simonek during the first Republic.

Houska Castle was built over a hole so deep in the ground that no one has ever reported seeing the bottom of it. This is cae3lled “The Gateway to Hell”. There are many legends surrounding this hole, including that there were creatures that were half human and half animal that would crawl out of it. There were also stories of creatures with dark wings that would fly above this area. One of the many legends is that a man who had been condemned to die was told that if he would descend down into the hole by rope and tell them what he saw there, that he would be set free. The man agreed and shortly after he was lowered, there were sounds of gut wrenching screams being heard. When he was pulled back to the top, it appeared as if he had aged 30 years in a mere few minutes. His hair was gray, his face was wrinkled and shortly after that he went stark raving mad. He died not long after this happened.

There is no water and no kitchen. It is not located near any trade routes and there were no occupants to live there when it was first built. It was not built as a sanctuary or residence Oronto, who was a Swedish rogue commander as his headquarters. He was reported to be an Alchemist and Black Magician that performed dark experiments in the castle. His life ended when he was shot through a window by some local villagers while he was supposedly working to discover the elixir of eternal life.

From 1939-1945 the German SS took over the castle, though no one was ever sure why and they made sure to destroy all of their records before leaving the

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castle when they learned that the Russian and American armies were advancing. It is thought that they may have been using it for various types of paranormal research. Another thought is that it was used by the SS as one of their secret breeding grounds, due to them trying to breed a superior race of people.

Today, the castle serves as a meeting place for experts on the occult, UFOs and all paranormal phenomena. There are also conferences that are held here.

No one will ever know the true purpose of Houska Castle. We can only choose to believe what we want to believe – so do you think this is truly the home to the Gateway to Hell?

Because this is located in the Czech Republic, the only official website is written completely in the Czech language. However, if you will Google it, you will find it listed on haunted tour sites for that area.

Mar 01

Paveglia Island, Italy

Deb Daniel Jansons

Deb Daniel Jansons

Assistant Director / Haunted Locations at National Paranormal Society
I am Deb Daniel Jansons. I was born and raised in the Huntsville, Al area, but lived in Ontario, Canada for 12 years, before coming back home to be with my grandson. I have had an interest in the paranormal since I was a small child and had my first experience. I love going out to places that are known to have strange things happen, but I always look for an explanation of anything that might happen when I am there and take nothing at face value. I also love to read anything that I can get my hands on concerning the paranormal and other people’s experiences. One of my hopes is that the day will come, during my lifetime that we will have absolute proof that there are spirits, aliens, etc out there. Until then, all we can do is investigate and hope.
Deb Daniel Jansons

Latest posts by Deb Daniel Jansons (see all)

pav1Paveglia Island is reported to be one of the most haunted locations in Italy. It’s a small island in the Venetian Lagoon located between Venice and Lido in Nothern Italy. There is a small canal that divided the island into 2 parts.

This island has a long history, first being mentioned in chronicles from 421. People from Padua and Este moved there to escape the barbarian invasions and in the 9th century, the population started to grow. Venice came under attack from the Genoan fleet in 1379 and the people were moved off of the island, when it became uninhabited. In 1527, it was offered to the Camaldolese Monks, but they refused the offer. Beginning in 1645, the Venetian government built 5 octagonal forts to protect and control the entrances into the lagoon. Today, the Pavelgia octagon is only 1 of 4 that continues to survive. Starting in 1776, it became a check point for any people and all goods going into or coming out of Venice by ship.

During the Roman era, people that fell victim to the plague were sent to the island and then during the reign of Napoleon Bonaparte when there was an outbreak of the “Black Death”, it was used for the same purpose. The people that died on the island were buried in a mass grave and their bodies were burned. The horror of these diseases also came in another form. If a person showed the slightest sign of being ill, they were sent to the island and burned alive.

In 1922, the existing buildings on the island were turned into a retirement home and insane asylum. Patients frequently reported to the doctors and nurses that they could hear the shrieks and tortured cries from the long dead victims of the plague.

pav2It has been reported that the head doctor experimented on the mental patients. It is said the he used cruel instruments, including drills to perform very crude lobotomies on the patients. He later either threw himself off of or fell from the hospital tower. He claimed that he was being driven mad by ghosts. According to the story, the actual fall didn’t kill him, but rather a strange mist rose up from the ground and strangled him to death. The hospital was finally closed in 1968.

There are reports that a family bought the island in order to turn it into a vacation home. However, they abandoned the property after only staying 1 night on the island. They reported that some unseen force split the face of one of their daughters that required 14 stitches to close it.

Even the local fishermen refuse to go into the waters of the island. They are frightened of pulling up human bones in their fishing nets, as it has been told that approximately 160,000 people have died on Pavelgia Island.

The island remains closed to visitors with very strict access restricted by the Italian government. Even today, the few people that the government does allow to go onto the island usually leave it terrified. They report that there is a heavy and evil feeling and they all agree that it was a place of much human suffering. Pavelgia Island seems to be especially tough on anyone with psychic abilities. However, even those without this gift report hearing tortured moans and seeing spirits.

One man that was granted permission to spend one night on the island alone, reported that when we entered one of the buildings, he heard a loud voice telling him to “leave immediately and do not return”. Most people that know the history of this island, tend to believe that this is sound advice.

Although I could not find an official website dedicated to Pavelgia Island, you can find much information and many photos just by typing the name into your favorite search engine.

Feb 19

The Rose Prince Pilgrimage In Lejac British Columbia

here Miracles Happen by Virginia Carraway Stark

Lejac British Columbia is now a way station between two very small towns,
Picture of Rose’s Grave during the annual pilgrimage in JulyScreenshot_1

Fraser Lake and Fort Fraser B.C., two towns along the infamous Highway of Tears. Rose Prince was a student at the residential school that used to stand in the field that is now empty of everything except for a graveyard, a shrine and once a year, thousands of people who come from around the world to witness the miracle that takes place outside my front door.

Father Vince James did not initiate the pilgrimages that began with a handful who wanted to come and remember their time with Rose, but he toiled over it and every year he prays for a miracle that will allow him to continue with the arduous job of planning out a gathering of so many people.

Screenshot_2 The Church and the Indigenous community work hard to feed all the pilgrims who come free of charge and provide the hillside as well as their own homes

Father Vince James OMI

for any and all who come to experience the peace and grace and the healing power of this place.

What makes the miracle happen?

Well, that’s all down to Rose. Rose lived an ordinary life. She was a quiet girl who suffered from a hunch in her back and was never physically very strong. She devoted her life to the church and died at a young age in 1949 of tuberculosis. She was buried in the cemetery and nobody really knew how special she was until two years later when the graveyard was being moved to a different location.

Rose’s coffin broke open when they tried to move it and inside they found a perfectly preserved body with even her clothes untouched by any rot.

Bodily incorruptibility is accepted by the Catholic Church as a sign from God of a life of great holiness. This is based off of scripture, “You will not allow your holy one to experience decay” -Acts 13:35

But it is also based off of historical research and avid documentation by the church. Since it’s inception there have only been about 200 cases where the body was preserved in such a way. Just to be clear: this is NOT mummification. The body is not desiccated, it is pristine and looks as though the person could still be alive.

They are sometimes described as being slightly translucent and that is the only thing that distinguishes them from the living.

After people started coming to the pilgrimage the pilgrims started to talk about the miracles they experienced. People’s pain went away, chronic diseases were cured, soon more and more people came, many of them bringing sick or dying friends in the hope that they too would experience a miracle.

People bring oil and water to be blessed during a ceremony at the site and they collect dirt from Rose’s grave to take home with them each year.

The church is still gathering evidence to make Rose a saint. It is an extensive procedure and is not undertaken lightly. Father James is tireless in his protection of the site and in his endless support of Rose.

I myself have attended the pilgrimage for several years and I was also a kind of caretaker for the site as well. I can say that it is one of the special places on this planet and the second weekend of July is even more special.

You can contact Father Vince James OMI at St. Andrews Parish, Box 580, Fraser Lake, B.C. V0J 1S0
250-699-6593

www.roseprincecatholic.net
www.pgdiocese.bc.ca

Feb 17

Sagada’s haunted locations are to die for!

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Sagada is a mysterious village in a mountainous province of the Philippines, about 250 miles from Manila. It’s just under a mile above sea-level and situated near the Chico River, much of it on switch back mountain roads. On my visit, I went by car from Manila to Banaue, followed by six hours in a private jeepney (a vibrant, rustic mode of transportation unique to the Philippines) to Sagada. It was a long and treacherous trip, but I was to discover it to be well worthwhile.

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Sagada immediately exuded a different feel to the rest of the Philippines. Rather than a palm tree-dominated landscape, here I discovered lush pine forests. In this fertile region, many agricultural products are grown, including Arabica coffee, brought by the Spanish colonialists, which is one of my personal favorites.  Also grown here are green peppers, potatoes, tomatoes and Valencia oranges.

Such items were brought to the Philippine Islands by a man named Jaime Masferre, who sought to feed American missionaries working with the Mission of Saint Mary the Virgin, though it was the Americans who brought the pine trees. The Americans also brought apples and strawberries, which flourish here because of the climate: the lowlands can get cool, and if you were an apple, you’d love it here.

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Sagada has mountains, and  a plethora of caves, as well as rice terraces that rival those found in bordering Ifugao province. But what is most notable about this place are the coffins that can be seen hanging precariously from the sides of mountains and in the area’s numerous caves.

A later visit to Torajaland in Indonesia made me feel that there must be some ancient link between these two cultures.

Placing coffins within caves or hanging them on the sides of mountains is still practiced in these cultures today.  To be buried in this fashion, something that has been happening for 2,000 years, one must have been married and have had grandchildren. The coffins are normally carved by the elderly Igorot people themselves before they pass away.

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We in the west have very different ways of dealing with death, and many may find such practices morbid and strange. In places like Sagada, visitors have the unique opportunity to experience an authentic culture dealing with death, free of Western influence.

The town is popular with local tourists and foreign backpackers. However, accommodation in Sagada is very basic: the guesthouses are one- or two-star at best. For those willing to rough it for a couple of days, though, it is a very interesting, unique experience. My guesthouse had no hot water, and no shower at all: there was only a big bucket of cold water you had to pour over yourself in the freezing morning air – a wake up call far more effective than coffee, to say the least.

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Local legend has it that Sagada was originally founded by Biag, a man from a place called Bika. The people of Bika were driven from their established home by headhunters. What were these headhunters searching for? No one is sure. Also interesting is the fact that in a country with a 90% Roman Catholic population, Sagada is 95% Protestant, due to  the influence of Protestant American missionaries. I spent my two days in Sagada visiting many caves, each stacked with coffins. I also embarked on a trip to an underground river and had my first spelunking experience in Sumaguing Cave, aptly translated as “Big Cave.”

There are apparently 60 known caves under Sagada and I decided to go check one out, not knowing what I was getting myself into.

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We entered the cave with our guide, who was clutching a gas lamp to light our way. We immediately climbed deep into the cave’s depths, and it was soon obvious that there was no going back.  Indeed, I was told that there was only one way out. The cave was beautiful, filled with stalactites and stalagmites, but to be honest, I felt uneasy. I’m not a cave-lover per se: tightspaces and water under the Earth can come across as daunting to me…and we were walking through freezing water that often reached our waists. We climbed deeper and deeper though narrow passages, like Indiana Jones on a mission. On our way, we passed plenty of bat guano, which is not only smelly but can cause you to slip and fall.

One passage was extremely narrow — probably 2.5 feet wide, with  water pouring through it. To make matters worse, we soon came to a hole that required slipping through at a 90-degree angle. I have never considered myself claustrophobic, but on this day I felt just that. It took about two hours before I emerged on the other side (though it felt much longer!). I’ve heard that the cave can be quite full of tourists, but on this day, only a German couple were among our company amongst the cave’s tight walls.

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Sagada is truly amazing. Trekking, waterfalls, photography, picnics, bonfires, rappelling and tribal culture make it a memorable, of-the-beaten-path destination ideal for nature-lovers. If you wish to see something truly out-of-this-world, and truly authentic, then Sagada is ideal for you

Why not contact  Remote Lands today at info@remotelands.com to begin planning your personal adventure to discover the hanging coffins and mysterious caves of mystical Sagada  in the Philippines?

Sources:

http://www.remotelands.com/blog/index.php/sagadas-hanging-coffins-and-caves-are-to-die-for/

http://oulieenocturnesopnine.tumblr.com/post/102231895157/sagadas-hanging-coffins-and-caves-are-to-die-for

Jan 04

The folklore of The Weeping Arch of New Bern

Katie Snow

Katie Snow

Chair: Aliens & UFO's at Dead Ringer Paranormal
My name is Kathy Snow however in the Paranormal world I am simply known as katie! My team and I take the paranormal field very seriously and have been up and down the eastern seaboard investigating known and unknown locations. My team consists of all family members giving us the opportunity to work well together with no drama. I am a national as well as internationally published paranormal writer. Our evidence has been shown on My ghost story caught on camera and we work hard within our community to bring awareness and understanding to the field. There are four ordained ministers on the team. After 16 years in the field we no longer do in house investigations as we are out trying to find unknown haunted locations and we consult on cases other teams may have questions on. After founding 3 teams, we have recently relocated and our new team name is Dead Ringer Paranormal. We are proud of the work we do and try to show the community it is a scientific field of study and a lot of work goes into what we all do. We are an old world team meaning we investigate with just what we need, we do not hook up wires and tons of equipment, we believe in studying the paranormal in traditional proven ways. I am excited and proud to have been asked to be a rep for NPS..
Katie Snow

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The folklore of The Weeping Arch of New Bern
By Kathy Snow

hauntedlocThe history of Cedar Grove Cemetery in New Bern, NC goes back to the early years of the 1800’s. During the yellow fever epidemic that ravaged this small town, the cemetery for The Christ Church could no longer hold all the bodies of the deceased, so a new cemetery was built on Queen Street. Then, in 1854 an arch was erected along with a wall encircling the graveyard. That’s when the creepy stuff is said to have begun.

What makes the arch unique is that it’s made from a locally quarried stone called ‘shell stone’ which is made up of sea shells and the fossilized remains of sea creatures kind of like a fossil if you may. What makes it different is that it is said that weeps on people in blood droplets or some would have it it bleeds. The blood tinged liquid ranges from a icky clear water tainted with a rust color to a deep red sticky substance.

The folklore goes that during a funeral procession into Cedar Grove cemetery, if one of the pallbearers is hit with a drop of liquid from this arch, they will be the next of the group to die and be carried in. What is really strange is the old timers who can give examples of this occurring including all the names and dates.

It seems that the arch doesn’t just bleed on people during funerals. At almost anytime, whether it has rained recently or not, the drips can be seen hitting the ground, or felt when the hit the body. What ever the color, it it said that the liquid never stains clothes and washes right out.

One of the origins of the weeping comes from the history of New Bern, where a governor named Spaight was killed in a duel with a man named Stanly. While killed according to the rules of the duel, it is said that the arch drips to the rhythm of “Avenge Spaight’s blood” dripping three drops and then a pause before dripping three more drops. Of course we know this is just legend…but is it? Why do the old timers have records of the happenings there and the deceased in which this occurred. It gives on something to think upon … Doesn’t it?

Sources
Wikipedia
Creepy Hauntings

Jan 01

Rose Hall Estate

Deb Daniel Jansons

Deb Daniel Jansons

Assistant Director / Haunted Locations at National Paranormal Society
I am Deb Daniel Jansons. I was born and raised in the Huntsville, Al area, but lived in Ontario, Canada for 12 years, before coming back home to be with my grandson. I have had an interest in the paranormal since I was a small child and had my first experience. I love going out to places that are known to have strange things happen, but I always look for an explanation of anything that might happen when I am there and take nothing at face value. I also love to read anything that I can get my hands on concerning the paranormal and other people’s experiences. One of my hopes is that the day will come, during my lifetime that we will have absolute proof that there are spirits, aliens, etc out there. Until then, all we can do is investigate and hope.
Deb Daniel Jansons

Latest posts by Deb Daniel Jansons (see all)

rhall Rose Hall Estate
Montego Bay, Jamaica

This month, we are going visit beautiful Montego Bay, Jamaica. Our final destination will be the Rose Hall Estate, which sits high on a hill with a panoramic view of the vivid blues of the ocean. We will be stepping back in time to a location where sugar was king of the island and she was still a jewel in the British Crown.

Annie Mae Patterson was born to an Irish father and an English mother, who moved her to Haiti when she was around 10 years old. It was here that she met her nanny, who would also become her teacher in the practice of Voodoo. Annie parents died when she was young, and the nanny continued to raise her and teach her Voodoo until her death when Annie was 18 years old. After the death of her nanny, Annie moved to the Island of Jamaica to seek her fame and fortune, in the manner of a rich husband. She is reputed to have been beautiful and petite, standing only 4′ 11″ tall.

It was in Montego Bay, Jamaica, that Annie met and married John Palmer. John owned Rose Hall Estate, which consisted of 7,000 acres of sugar and 2,000 slaves, in addition to his large and ornate home. Annie had found her fame and fortune. However, happiness in her marriage to John was short lived.

Annie began to take slaves as lovers and John found out about it. One day he found her with one of her lovers and proceeded to beat her with a crop. Outraged over what had happened, Annie poisoned his coffee and John died, leaving her the sole heir of his vast estate and holdings.

After the death of her husband, Annie became a tyrant. She could often be heard shouting at the slaves from her balcony. She often had slaves tortured and killed for displeasing her, or simply to use them as an example to the others.

She took a string of slaves as her lovers, none of which lasted long. When she would tire of them, she would murder them. In addition to her lovers, she also took two other men as her husband, supposedly killing them also and inheriting their wealth, to add to her own. She had each of her husband’s buried by the slaves and then killed them before they could return to the estate. Her terrible treatment of the slaves, along with the rumors of her Voodoo rituals earned her the name, the White Witch of Rose Hall.

Annie finally made a fatal mistake that would ultimately cost her her own life. She set her sights on Robert Rutherford, a bookkeeper. However, much to her displeasure, Robert was totally in love with another. Annie placed a Voodoo curse on the woman in question which is called “Old Hige”. This curse will cause a ghost to visit the victim of the ritual whose very presence will cause the victim to slowly wither away and die. Annie’s mistake came in casting this spell on the granddaughter of the local obeah man, Takoo. Her name was Millicent and when she died, Takoo became so outraged over her death, that he rounded up an army of slaves and they strangled Annie Palmer to death.

The White Witch of Rose Hall was immediately buried in a deep hole on the estate. The slaves also gathered all of her personal belongings and burned them, fearful that her spirit had somehow tainted them. A Voodoo ritual was also carried out when Annie was buried. However, it is said that the ritual was not performed correctly and that her spirit still haunts Rose Hall to this very day.

In 1977, a former Miss USA, Michele Rollins and her husband, John, bought Rose Hall Estate and went to great personal expense to refurbish it. They allow tours to be carried out on the property which includes the dungeon where bloodstains can still be seen on the walls.

Night time tours are also available for those who are not weak of heart and spirit. If you ever get the chance to visit Montego Bay, Jamaica, and you go to Rose Hall, maybe you will be the one to catch the spirit of Annie Palmer, the White Witch of Rose Hall in a photo. Just be wary and don’t let the banging on the walls or the footsteps of an unseen visitor frighten you too much.

www.rosehall.com

Nov 01

The Aokigahara Forest, Japan

Deb Daniel Jansons

Deb Daniel Jansons

Assistant Director / Haunted Locations at National Paranormal Society
I am Deb Daniel Jansons. I was born and raised in the Huntsville, Al area, but lived in Ontario, Canada for 12 years, before coming back home to be with my grandson. I have had an interest in the paranormal since I was a small child and had my first experience. I love going out to places that are known to have strange things happen, but I always look for an explanation of anything that might happen when I am there and take nothing at face value. I also love to read anything that I can get my hands on concerning the paranormal and other people’s experiences. One of my hopes is that the day will come, during my lifetime that we will have absolute proof that there are spirits, aliens, etc out there. Until then, all we can do is investigate and hope.
Deb Daniel Jansons

Latest posts by Deb Daniel Jansons (see all)

aokigahara-forest-108Located less than 100 miles west of the city of Tokyo and located at the base of Mount Fugi, sits a dense and desolate place known as The Aokigahara Forest. It is formed in the lava flow from that famous volcano from the 9th century. There are also 2 caves located in the forest, known as the Ice Cave and the Wind Cave, which makes this location especially favored by tourists.
Unlike most forests, there is hardly any wild life that resides within the forest, which makes it a very quiet place to be. This is one of the reasons that it is so popular with the locals. This dense and quiet forest holds a much darker secret in its’ quietness, because it’s the number one spot for the Japanese to visit when they decide to commit suicide.

Many people consider the quietness of the forest to mean that it’s haunted and there are a lot of the Japanese people that refuse to even consider entering this place of death.

There have been so many suicides to take place here that the police no longer publish the yearly data. In 2003, it was made public for the last time when there were a staggering 105 confirmed suicides. Many believe that more suicides happen in the forest than are confirmed, but that their bodies are never found due to the denseness of the forest.

When you enter The Aokigahara Forest, there are signs posted in both Japanese and English, trying to dissuade suicide as an end. One states, “Your life is something precious that was given to you by your parents”. Another states, “Meditate on your parents, siblings and your children once more. Do not be troubled alone.”.

[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”]It’s hard for officials to profile the average person that seeks out The Aokigahara Forest to end their lives.[/pullquote] The ones found are usually males between the ages of 40-50 years old. March seems to be the most active month for people deciding to end their lives. Some people think this is the most active month for suicides because it marks the end of Japan’s fiscal year.

The Aokigahara Forest hasn’t always been a place where people went wishing to end their lives. Although there is evidence that tells us that as far back as the 19th Century, this forest is where the Japanese would take their elders to die of starvation, which is a practice called ubasute. In the 1960’s a novel entitled “Tower of Waves” talked about a couple going into this forest together to commit suicide and first made this a popular place to end a life. In 1993, another book, this one by Wataru Tsurumi, entitled, “The Complete Manual of Suicide” fanned the flames and the suicide rate increased. This book even described parts of the forest that are less visited, so that bodies cannot be found later.

As macabre as it may sound, the Japanese organize an annual body sweep of the forest prior to the holiday season. They remove all bodies that can be found, and if possible identify them for their families.

It is quite baffling why there is such a high rate of suicides in Japan. It may have something to do with the Japanese psyche and the fact that many Japanese men feel rejected when they become entrenched. Most of them held position of high authority within the companies where they worked.

Maybe they felt as if they could not face their families and friends. In the same manner as the Samurai Warriors, of days gone by, perhaps they felt that suicide was the one way that they could atone for their failures in life.

www.aokigahara-forest.com

Oct 01

Yester Castle, Scotland

Greig Pow

Greig Pow

International Rep: United Kingdom at National Paranormal Society
I have spent my life pursuing the existence of extraterrestrials. From a young age I would immerse myself in local libraries absorbing as much information on the possibility that we had been visited by another species, the thought of it inspired me to pursue it through my adult life. I realised after a period of time that my answer lay in the realms of science and I studied the aspects of science and extraterrestrials. Later in life I had my first experience with a ghost in my home I recently moved into . It scared me at first and I remember waking up the next morning compelled to recreate what had happened. I tried to debunk what I saw and to no avail I couldn’t. I began a journey to find what out what happened to me and to prove what I seen was real. I still pursue this amongst a lot of other things that exist beyond the realms of my understanding. I use science and technology, I think skeptical and critically because I always believe if you approach research and investigate as a skeptic you will find the truth.
Greig Pow

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SCOT1Haunted Scotland.
Approximately 30 miles outside Edinburgh , is a village called Gifford. What lies on the outskirts of the village is said to be the 3rd most haunted location in Scotland, Yester Castle . Before I delve into the reasons of this lets look at the history of the location.
Sir Hugo Giffard was the builder of the original Yester Castle. The castle is mentioned by name in a Yester charter of Adam de Morham, in which he cedes some adjacent land to his neighbor Sir Hugh Giffard. This charter is dated between 1250 and 1267, showing the castle was built and completed before the year 1267.
The locals in the nearby village where rumours were rife about Hugo and the fact that he practiced black magic and he was a necromancer[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”]Rumours were rife about Hugo and the fact that he practiced black magic and he was a necromancer.[/pullquote]. One of the rumours were around that he made a deal with the devil himself to help build the great hall of the castle with the use of a goblin army ( hence why it’s called the Goblin Ha).SCOT3
When the castle was destroyed and re-built in the early 14th century, this legendary lower chamber was the only feature retained. The village of Bothans was located on the grounds of the Yester estate in this period. Bothans was razed and moved to the modern site of the nearby village of Gifford in the 17th century. St. Bothans, the church of Yester, was consecrated by Bishop David de Burnham in 1241.
Later on in years the Giffard family moved to Yester house and the castle was sadly left to ruin and to this day lies In a derelict state. Unfortunately all that is left is a very small part of the castle including (allegedly) the great hall or goblin hall.
People have reported in the past of strange goings on in the castle from voices , black masses and full bodied apparitions. When you SCOT2walk around the area there is a strange eerie feeling to the place and accessing the area is a hike through a golf course and woodland. I have investigated the place with my team on several occasions with mixed results. I have spoken to locals several times about the area and some people will not go near the place as the fear there is a curse ( due to renovations at the castle and several accidents with workers causing the renovations to be ceased).
My own personal experiences have included a black mass standing in front of me and several intelligent responses to questions.
Even today when I visit the place, there is evidence of black magic being practiced there as well as paranormal investigations
Have a look on YouTube , there is some interesting videos about the place.
Greig.

Oct 01

Old Changi Hospital, Singapore

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

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old-changi-hospital

Old Changi Hospital, located on a small hill along Netheravon Road in Singapore, was a small British military hospital named Royal Air Force Hospital. It was used by the Japanese soldiers during World War II as a healthcare facility for the prisoners-of-war detained at the Changi military base nearby. With more than 70 years of rich history when it survived the war from 1942 to 1945 witnessing the fall of Singapore and the tortures of the prisoners-of-war that happened there, this hospital is one of the most haunted places in Asia. Stories about the building being haunted started in the early 1940s. In particular, the morgue always had sightings of ghosts without heads and feet, and seeing spirits of different races and nationalities wandering around the compound is very common. However, there are recent plans to turn this area into a lifestyle haven of resorts, spas and restaurants.
http://www.abillionlittlestars.com/2013/08/10-most-haunted-places-in-asia/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Changi_Hospital
http://seeksghosts.blogspot.com/2013/11/singapores-old-changi-hospital.html

Oct 01

Gakona Lodge and Trading Post

Deb Daniel Jansons

Deb Daniel Jansons

Assistant Director / Haunted Locations at National Paranormal Society
I am Deb Daniel Jansons. I was born and raised in the Huntsville, Al area, but lived in Ontario, Canada for 12 years, before coming back home to be with my grandson. I have had an interest in the paranormal since I was a small child and had my first experience. I love going out to places that are known to have strange things happen, but I always look for an explanation of anything that might happen when I am there and take nothing at face value. I also love to read anything that I can get my hands on concerning the paranormal and other people’s experiences. One of my hopes is that the day will come, during my lifetime that we will have absolute proof that there are spirits, aliens, etc out there. Until then, all we can do is investigate and hope.
Deb Daniel Jansons

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gakonaOk folks, let’s dress in our warmest clothes, put on our parka’s, scarves, gloves and lace up our snow boots because this month we’re heading north. Make sure that you have your favorite investigative tools loaded up, because here we go. We will be stopping at the Gakona Lodge and Trading Post in Gakona, Alaska.

Gakona, Alaska is located in the Copper River Valley in the interior of south central Alaska. It’s adjacent to the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. It’s also 200 miles north of Anchorage.

[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”]It is said that John stomps his feet and smokes his pipe in this room. Even though there has been a no smoking policy at the lodge for a while now – you can still smell the wafting scent of pipe tobacco in that room.[/pullquote]The Ahtna Indians have lived in this area for approximately 5,000-7,000 years. Gakona originally served as a wood and fish camp before becoming a permanent village for them.

Jim Doyle homesteaded the area in 1902 and in 1904, he built the lodge, an ice house and a storage shed. It became known as Doyle’s Roadhouse. The original building is still standing on the property, even though it is no longer in use. By 1905, gold fever had spread to the valley and prospectors were coming in.

Life in the cold harsh north was always unpredictable and there were always many travelers along the way looking for a hot meal, a warm bed or even a place to rob. There were even rumors that a notorious serial killer known as the Blueberry Kid was in the area and could have stayed at the roadhouse.

Doyle sold out in 1912. Between then and the 1920’s the roadhouse had passed through several owners, before finally coming into the hands of a Norwegian man and his wife, Arne and Henra Sundt. Arne died of a heart attack in 1946, and his wife continued on with the business until she finally sold the property to Jerry and Barbara Strang in 1976.

The Strang family were the first owners to report paranormal activity on the property. In the Springfield Sunday Republican on April 5, 1987, Barbara Strang told of a strange and unexplained event that had taken place at the lodge. According to Mrs. Strang, some of the kitchen workers were trying to contact a spirit that they thought resided in the room, when the power went out. Now, according to her, losing power is common, but she did feel that the timing was peculiar.

There is also a story about a man named John Paulsen. It is said that John was not only a customer, but a business partner as well. John always stayed in Room #5. It is said that John stomps his feet and smokes his pipe in this room. Even though there has been a no smoking policy at the lodge for a while now – you can still smell the wafting scent of pipe tobacco in that room.

If you should decide to venture north to Alaska and visit the Gakona Lodge and Trading Post…..if you ask to say in Room # 5…..and, if you ask nicely, maybe – just maybe, John will share his pipe with you, as he stomps his feet.

www.gakonalodge.com

Sep 01

Glamis Castle

Ken Weigand

Ken Weigand

Senior Director / Webmaster at National Paranormal Society
Ken is a graphic designer, web developer and co-founder of One True Paranormal, a para-group in southwest Missouri.
Ken Weigand

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glamis castle

Glamis Castle, Glamis Tayside, Scotland

When you see a photo of Glamis Castle, or the actual castle itself, it’s like looking at something straight out of the pages of many fairytales. You would never believe that it is considered to be the most haunted castle in Scotland. Over the years, there have been legends and stories, that in addition to ghosts, include a witch and a vampire that call this magnificent castle “home”.

[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”] Did the devil actually take Beardie’s soul and condemn him to play cards until doomsday? There have been numerous reports of Beardie standing over the beds of children watching them and loud shouts coming from him.[/pullquote]There was a village here, many years before a royal hunting lodge or castle were even thought of, that can be traced all the way back to the 8th century. An Irish missionary by the name of Fergus settled in this area in 710 A.D. The church St. Fergus Kirk, was named after him. There was a Pictish stone found in the nearby village of Eassie, that shows there are prehistoric traces in this area. A Royal Hunting Lodge stood at the site in 1034, where King Malcolm II was murdered. Shakespeare’s play, “Macbeth” has the character of Macbeth dying at Glamis Castle, even though the actual King Macbeth had no connection to the castle at all.

Sir John Lyon, Thane of Glamis, married King Robert II’s daughter in 1376 and a castle was built that has remained in the Lyon’s and Bowes-Lyon’s family since that time, except for a time when King James V lived in the home.

There is a legend involving Earl Beardie from the 15th century. There are several versions of the story, but they all revolve around Earl Beardie playing cards. The story takes place on a Sunday and according to 2 of the stories, either his hosts refused to play cards with him, or a servant advised him to stop because it was after all the Sabbath. Lord Beardie became so enraged that he vowed to play cards until doomsday, or with the actual Devil, depending on the version of the story. A stranger suddenly shows up at the castle and joins the Earl in a game of cards. The stranger is identified with the Devil. The 2 men basically rocked the castle with their swearing and yelling. One story includes a servant that tried to take a peak into the room where they were playing, thru the keyhole and was struck blind. Lord Beardie was found dead the next morning. Did the devil actually take Beardie’s soul and condemn him to play cards until doomsday? There have been numerous reports of Beardie standing over the beds of children watching them and loud shouts coming from him.

The 6th Lord Glamis, John Lyon, married a woman by the name of Janet Douglas. She was the daughter of the Master of Angus, who at the time was involved in a feud with King James V. Janet was accused of treason against the King in December of 1528, for bringing supporters of the Earl of Angus to Edinburgh. Her husband, the 6th Lord of Glamis, had died on Sept. 17, 1528, so she was charged with poisoning him. She was eventually accused of witchcraft and burned at the stake at Edinburgh on July 17, 1537.

There is a small chapel in the castle. The chapel is still used today, but 1 seat is always left vacant and no one is allowed to sit there. This seat has been reserved for the “Grey Lady”, a ghost that is said to live at the castle. The Grey Lady is thought to be the ghost of Jane Douglas, Lady Glamis. She has been seen and felt by a number of visitors to the castle over the past 3 centuries. She walks around the chapel and has also been seen above the clock tower.

The most famous legend associated with the castle is the Monster of Glamis. The “monster” was supposedly a hideously deformed child that was born into the family. Some of these stories came from the accounts of a singer and composer by the name of Virginia Gabriel who stayed in the castle during 1870. In her story, the “monster” was kept in the castle for its’ entire life and his rooms were bricked up after his death. Another version of this story is that every generation of the family has had a vampire child born into the family and is walled up in the room

It is said that guests of the castle once hung towels from the windows of every single room, trying to find the bricked up room where the “monster” lived. As the story goes, when they would look at the building from the outside, there were several windows that did not have towels hanging from them.

Some think that the legend of the “monster” was inspired by a true story. There was a family by the name of Ogilvie. They sought protection from a family that was their enemy at the castle. Somewhere inside the 16 ft. thick walls of the castle is the famous “room of skulls”, where the Ogilvie family were all walled up and died of starvation.

Hamish Rue Glamis, the 9th Laird of Glamis, was executed for treason after being betrayed by the Ruthven family. His ghost has been seen several times in full Scottish regalia. It is said that if you hear Scottish music being played, that this is signaling the specture funeral procession of Hamish. You can see 6 dark figures carrying a blackened coffin across the castle grounds.

Other stories include a “tongue-less woman”. She has been seen running across the castle grounds at midnight, tearing at her mouth. There are other reports of screaming, banging noises and doors that refuse to stay closed, even after they have been bolted and hammered shut. There is a story of a young black boy that is seen sitting in an old stone seat by the door of the Queen’s bedroom. There have reports of this sighting for at least 200 years.

Glamis Castle is open to the public. If you feel like taking a vacation or trip to Scotland, be sure to check out this magnificent piece of Scottish history and maybe…..just maybe if you are very lucky, you will see one of the past residents of the castle dropping in to tell you hello. Just beware of becoming involved in a card game with Lord Beardie.

For more information on Glamis Castle, you can go to their official website
www.glamis-castle.co.uk/visitus.cfm

 

Aug 01

Belle Mont Mansion

Ken Weigand

Ken Weigand

Senior Director / Webmaster at National Paranormal Society
Ken is a graphic designer, web developer and co-founder of One True Paranormal, a para-group in southwest Missouri.
Ken Weigand

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Belle MontBelle Mont was erected in 1828 for a physician from Louisa County, Virginia, Dr. Alexander Williams Mitchell. Dr. Mitchell and his family of seven were already living in Belle Mont when it was fully completed in 1832. Owning 1,680 acres of cotton and corn, Dr. Mitchell became known as one of the largest planters in the area before he quickly sold the mansion and the surrounding land one year after its completion.

However, while living in Belle Mont and planting the surrounding acres, Dr. Mitchell housed 152 slaves in 13 slave cabins on the property. This area of the property can be accessed from the master bedroom through a large door with a window that leads directly to the courtyard area, which is where the detached kitchen would have been accessed as well.

The Mitchell family sold Belle Mont and 33 of the surrounding acres to their friends Isaac and Catherine Baker Jones Winston, who were also from Virginia, in 1833. Mr. Winston was a cousin of Dolly Madison, Patrick Henry, and Isaac Cole, who was a personal friend and secretary of President Thomas Jefferson. Although the actual design of Belle Mont is a mystery, this particular relationship provides a clue about the original designer, or at least his influence.
The source of Belle Mont’s design is shrouded in mystery, but tantalizing clues suggest the direct influence of President Thomas Jefferson, gentlemen architect of the early Republic,” the official Belle Mont pamphlet states (Commission 2). Is it possible that Dr. Mitchell built Belle Mont in this style, two years after Jefferson’s death, to honor the late president? The answer will always be a mystery. However, the pamphlet continues by claiming that, “characteristics of ‘Jeffersonian Classicism’ are exhibited at Belle Mont, including finely executed brickwork with contrasting woodwork and a hilltop setting. Belle Mont also illustrates Jefferson’s reverence for the neoclassical architectural elements and ideas of the Italian Renaissance architect, Andrea Palladio,” 

The Winston family maintained ownership and continued living in Belle Mont through the Civil War and until around 1940. At this time, the family decided to move to a different location but continued to hold Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations in the mansion. Gradually, the family gatherings became less frequent until the home was completely abandoned.

The abandonment of the home was the largest cause of its deterioration and the vandalism that occurred at Belle Mont. During the 1960s, star-crossed lovers camped inside the rotting mansion in the woods, and the home has long been the site of drunken high school parties. In 1983, concerned about the condition of the house, members of the Winston family donated Belle Mont and 33 surrounding acres to the Alabama Historical Commission.
The house and surrounding property are reportedly haunted by the former slaves that lived and died on the plantation. As there is not formal cemetery for the slaves it is likely that they were buried on some part of the estate. Visitors to the mansion have reported seeing dark shadowy figures walking the fields and have heard the sound of chains rattling near the house.
http://bellemont.weebly.com/history.html
http://www.mystery411.com/Landing_bellemonttuscumbia.html

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