Category Archive: R

Jan 13

Anna Riva

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

NPSGraphic

Anna Riva (1922–2005)was the pen name of Dorothy Spencer, who was a well-known American occult author and manufacturer of hoodoo spiritual supplies. According to Catherine Yronwode, “Anna Riva” was a nom de plume that this author used only in her writing and business; Anna was her mother’s name and Riva was her daughter’s name.

According to Craft Magick, Dorothy Spencer was born in 1923 and began writing as Anna Riva in the 1960s.
In Spiritual Merchants, Carolyn Morrow Long described how the “1970s and 1980s saw the publication of a new crop of spell books” for products available from the same companies selling the books. “The best-known of these writers is the extremely prolific Dorothy Spencer, who writes under the name ‘Anna Riva.'”   Spencer’s books contained collected spells from many traditions, including Neopagan sources, European occultism, and the Judeo-Chrisiatian grimoire tradition, and they often included mention of African American folk magic as well as Haitian Voodoo.

In addition to writing books on magic, Spencer produced an extensive line of magical oils, incenses and powders which were sold by numerous occult suppliers. When Spencer retired in the late 1990s, her company, International Imports of Los Angeles, was purchased by Indio Products, which continued to manufacture spiritul supplies bearing the Anna Riva name, as well as keeping her books in print.

In 2000, the owner of Indio Products, Marty Mayer, stated that the woman known as Anna Riva was suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. In Spiritual Merchants (2001), Carolyn Long wrote “Dorothy Spencer is now quite elderly and, unfortunately, suffers from Alzheimer’s disease, so I was unable to interview her.” She died in 2005.

Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Riva

Jan 13

Dorothy Jane Roberts

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

JaneRoberts

Dorothy Jane Roberts (May 8, 1929 – September 5, 1984) was an American author, poet, self-proclaimed psychic and spirit medium, who claimed to channel an energy personality who called himself “Seth”. Her publication of the Seth texts, known as the “Seth Material”, established her as one of the preeminent figures in the world of paranormal phenomena. The Yale University Library Manuscripts and Archives maintains a collection entitled Jane Roberts Papers (MS 1090), which documents the career and personal life of Jane Roberts, including journals, poetry, correspondence, audio and video recordings and other materials donated after her death by Roberts’ husband and other individuals and organizations.

Early life and career

Roberts was born in a hospital in Albany, New York and grew up in nearby Saratoga Springs, New York. Her parents, Delmer Hubbell Roberts and Marie Burdo, divorced when she was two years old. With her only child, the young Marie then returned to her own parents, and the home that the family had rented for a number of years: half of a double dwelling in a poor neighborhood in Saratoga Springs. Marie had begun experiencing the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis by 1932, but worked as much as possible. Eventually Roberts’ grandfather, Joseph Burdo, with whom she shared a deep mystical identification, was unable to support two extra people, and the family had to rely upon public assistance. Roberts’ grandmother was killed in an automobile accident in 1936.

The next year, her grandfather moved out of the house. By then Marie was partially incapacitated, and the Welfare Department began to furnish mother and daughter with occasional (and often unreliable) domestic help. When Marie became a bedridden invalid, it was Jane’s responsibility to take care of her. This included cooking, cleaning, bringing her the bedpan, and getting up in the middle of the night to refuel the stove. Her embittered mother used to tell Jane that she was going to turn on the gas jets in the middle of the night and kill them both. “My mother was a real bitch,” Jane said, “but she was an energetic bitch. When my mother attempted suicide for about the fifth time, she took a whole mess of sleeping pills and was in the hospital. I went to the welfare lady and said, ‘I can’t take it anymore. I’ve just got to leave.'” Over and over Marie told Jane that she was no good, that the daughter’s birth had caused the mother’s illness, that she was disowned and considered no longer her daughter.

The persistent psychological abuse and mistreatment by her mother resulted in the young girl’s deep fear of abandonment. Such situations increased Jane’s sense of not being safe, yet also reinforced feelings of independence, for she did not have to feel as dependent upon Marie as she might otherwise. Well before she was 10 years old Jane had developed persistent symptoms of colitis. By her early teens she had an overactive thyroid gland. Her vision was poor; she required very strong glasses (which she seldom wore).

For most of 1940 and half of 1941 Jane was in a strictly-run Catholic orphanage in Troy, NY while her mother was hospitalized in another city for treatment of her arthritis. Priests came to the house regularly and support was offered to the fatherless family. Jane’s initial bonding to the cultural beliefs of religion was very strong to make up for the lack of a loving, nurturing family. However, some of Jane’s very early poetry using ideas akin to reincarnation offended one priest, who burned her books on the Fall of Rome.

The ‘troublesome’ material remained relatively inactive until her curiosity and ability led her to actively challenge those ideas while she was also in a situation where the natural fear of abandonment might be suggested. For a time she was left between belief systems. Jane began working at a variety store in the summer of 1945, when she was 16 years old. It was her first job. That fall she continued on the job after school hours, and on an occasional Saturday. After attending public schools, she attended Skidmore College from 1947 to 1950 on a poetry scholarship. Roberts’ grandfather died when she was age 19. It was a time of severe shock for her. She was beginning to substitute scientific belief for religious belief.

Jane had been going with a fellow named Walt Zeh at the time, and they decided to go to the west coast by motorcycle to see Jane’s father (who had also come from a broken home). Jane then married Walt, a long-time Saratoga Springs friend, and continued to write while taking a variety of other jobs, including society editor for the Saratoga newspaper and as a supervisor in a radio factory. They lived together for three years. She “then found out — [while she] was working in a radio factory putting lover-boy Walt through school what everybody else in town knew – [that] he isn’t going through school.” It was then in February 1954 while “cutting up, dancing, and raisin’ hell at a party,” that Jane first met the former commercial artist Robert Fabian Butts, Jr. (June 20, 1919 – May 26, 2008). The bachelor had shown up at the shindig on a last-minute impulse. The fourth time they met, at another party and never having dated, Jane “just looked at him and said, ‘Look, I’m leaving Walt, and I’m going to live by myself or I’m going to live with you, so just let me know.”

Eventually the two left town together and Jane filed for divorce. Jane and Rob married on December 27, 1954 at the home of his parents in Sayre, PA.

Roberts wrote in a variety of genres: poetry, short stories, children’s literature, nonfiction, science fiction and fantasy and novels. She was the only woman invited to the first science-fiction writer’s conference in 1956 in Milford, PA. The couple moved to Elmira, NY, in 1960, to find steady part-time work – Rob in the local greeting card company, Jane in an art gallery. Their lives seemed set, their art defined. Now in her 30s, she and her husband began to record what she said were messages from a personality named “Seth”, and she wrote several books about the experience.

Seth Material

On a September evening in 1963, their everyday worldview changed. Roberts sat down at her table to work on poetry; Butts’ was in his back-room studio, painting. “It was very domestic, very normal, very unpsychedelic,” she would later remember. And then “Between one normal minute and the next, a fantastic avalanche of radical, new ideas burst into my head with tremendous force … It was as if the physical world were really tissue-paper-thin, hiding infinite dimensions of reality, and I was flung through the tissue paper with a huge ripping sound.” When she “came to,” Roberts found herself scrawling the title of this odd batch of notes: The Physical Universe as Idea Construction. Before this, she had never had any interest in psychic phenomena, and though her fiction typically dealt with such themes as clairvoyance and reincarnation, intellectually neither she nor Butts believed in extrasensory abilities or that anyone survived death once, let alone many times. Yet soon after this episode, Roberts suddenly began recalling her dreams, including two that were inarguably precognitive, the first, as far as she knew, that she’d ever had. Their curiosity piqued, the couple decided to investigate further, and she managed to land a contract with a New York publisher for a do-it-yourself book on extra-sensory perception.

In late 1963, Roberts and Butts started experimenting with a Ouija board as part of Roberts’ research for the book. According to Roberts and Butts, on December 2, 1963 they began to receive coherent messages from a male personality who eventually identified himself as Seth. Soon after, Roberts reported that she was hearing the messages in her head. The first seven sessions were entirely with the Ouija board. The three-hour session on the evening of Jan. 2, 1964 was the first where she began to dictate the messages instead of using the Ouija board. For a while she still opened her sessions with the board, but finally was able to abandon it after the 27th session on Feb. 19, 1964. She began to dictate the messages instead of using the Ouija board, and she eventually abandoned the board.

Roberts described the process of writing the Seth books as entering a trance state. She said Seth would assume control of her body and speak through her, while her husband wrote down the words she spoke. They referred to such episodes as “readings” or “sessions”. The 26th session on Feb. 18, 1964 was the first held in the presence of another person, a friend.

On Jan. 17, 1964 Roberts channeled an allegedly recently deceased woman who told Butts that he and his wife’s work with Seth was a life-time project, that they would publish his manuscripts, and help spread his ideas.At the 27th session Seth also told the couple how to rearrange the furniture in their apartment which would better suit their energies. Despite feelings of disbelief toward both messages, the couple somewhat reluctantly agreed. Two days afterwards they heard from a psychologist interested in reincarnation to whom they had written three weeks earlier with some session copies enclosed. The psychologist told them that the very fluency of the material suggested that it might come from Roberts’ subconscious, though it was impossible to tell. He also cautioned that in some circumstances, amateur mediumship could lead to mental problems.

The letter upset me considerably, yet it also objectified some of my own doubts. They were out in the air where I could at least deal with them. As far as the we could tell, for all of my stewing and hemming and hawing, there were no alarming changes in my personality. I was doing twice the creative work I had done earlier. I was satisfied with the quality of the Seth Material; it was far superior to anything I could do on my own. If nothing else, I thought the sessions presented a way of making deeply unconscious knowledge available on a consistent basis.

Because we were so innocent about psychic literature, we weren’t hampered by superstitious fears about such [psychic] phenomena. I didn’t believe in gods or demons, so I didn’t fear them. I wanted to learn. Rob and I had discovered a whole new world together, and we were going to explore it.

There was a constant battle, though, as some of our results ran full tilt into my intellectual ideas. In the beginning, I took it for granted that Seth was a subconscious fantasy, personified, because I simply couldn’t accept the possibility of spirits or, for that matter, life after death. Then, after it became obvious that the Seth sessions were going to continue, we kept constant check on my personality characteristics and went to a psychologist – as any sane, red-blooded American would do under such circumstances in those days. Seth seemed far more mature and well-balanced than the psychologist, so finally I stopped worrying. Besides, my personality showed no adverse signs of instability. If anything, I was more competent in handling physical affairs. This is not to say the experience did not cause certain strains and stresses that could accompany any worthwhile venture in an entirely new field.

Roberts also purportedly channeled the world views of several other people, including the philosopher William James,Rembrandt, and the Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne, through a process she described as using a typewriter to write “automatically.”

For 21 years until Roberts’ death in 1984 (with a one-year hiatus due to her final illness), Roberts held more than 1500 regular, private or deleted and “ESP class” trance sessions in which she spoke on behalf of Seth.Butts served as stenographer, taking the messages down in home-made shorthand, and having others on occasion make recording of some sessions. The messages from Seth channeled through Roberts consisted mostly of monologues on a wide variety of topics. They were published by Prentice-Hall under the collective title Seth Material.

Over the years, hundreds of people witnessed Seth speaking. Some went to the ESP classes Roberts held (Tuesday and some Thursday nights, Sept. 1967 – Feb. 1975)for an evening, others attended for longer periods. (By this time Jane had given up her gallery work, and was teaching nursery school during part of this time.) Outside of the ESP class structure, Roberts gave many personal Seth sessions to various individuals who had written her, asking for help. She never charged for those sessions; however, at some point she did charge $2.50 to $3.50 per ESP class of 5 to 40 people. When the books began to sell in sufficient numbers, she dropped that fee.Book sessions were almost always private, held on Monday and Wednesday evenings without witnesses from 1967 through 1982 (except for Tues and Thurs from Aug. to Nov. 1981).

The material through 1969 was published in summary form in The Seth Material, written by Roberts from the output of the channeling sessions. Beginning in January 1970, Roberts wrote books which she described as dictated by Seth. Roberts claimed no authorship of these books beyond her role as medium. This series of “Seth books” totaled ten volumes. The last two books appear to be incomplete due to Roberts’ illness. Butts contributed extensive footnotes, appendices, and other comments to all the Seth books, and thus was a co-author on all of them. These additions describe what was going on in Roberts’ and his life at the time of the various sessions, annotated some of Seth’s comments in light of contemporary beliefs and materials that Roberts and Butts were reading, described excerpts from some fan mail and letters from professionals commenting on Seth’s material about their fields, and especially later, provided insight as to the many steps of production of multiple books with the publisher. By February 1982 they were still receiving “from 30 to 50 letters and packages a week” from readers of their various books.[36] Some of Roberts’ earlier and later poetry was occasionally included to show how she had touched upon some of Seth’s concepts.Roberts also wrote The Oversoul Seven trilogy to explore via fiction some of Seth’s teachings on the concepts of reincarnation and oversouls.

According to Roberts, Seth described himself as an “energy personality essence no longer focused in physical matter”, and was independent of Roberts’ subconscious. Roberts initially expressed skepticism as to Seth’s origins, wondering if he was a part of her own personality. As Seth, Roberts at times appeared stern, jovial or professorial. “His” voice was deeper and more masculine sounding than Jane’s and was possessed of a distinct, although not identifiable, accent. Unlike the psychic Edgar Cayce, whose syntax when speaking in trance was antiquated and convoluted, Roberts’ syntax and sentence structures were modern and clear when speaking as Seth. Later books continued to develop but did not contradict the material introduced in earlier works. Some Practice Elements were even given so that the readers could see how a few of the concepts could be practically experienced.

A few contemporary world events were commented upon by Seth, such as the Jonestown Guyana deaths and the Three Mile Island accident.  Seth also provided an alternative creation myth to that of either the Big Bang or Intelligent Design.

Roberts’ father died in November 1971 at the age of 68; her mother died six months later at the same age. In early 1982 Roberts spent a month in the hospital for severely underactive thyroid gland, protruding eyes and double vision, an almost total hearing loss, a slight anemia, budding bedsores—and a hospital-caused staph infection She recovered to an extent, but died two and a half years later in 1984, having been bedridden with severe arthritis—like her mother—for the final year and a half of her life. Roberts had spent 504 consecutive days in a hospital in Elmira, N.Y. The immediate causes of her death were a combination of protein depletion, osteomyelitis, and soft-tissue infections. These conditions arose out of her long-standing rheumatoid arthritis. (Butts believed for some 15 years that in Roberts’ case, at least, the young girl’s psychological conditioning was far more important—far more damaging, in those terms—than any physical tendency to inherit the disease.) Roberts was cremated the next day, in a process she and Butts had agreed upon several years earlier. After Roberts’ death, lovingly recorded in The Way Toward Health (1997), Butts continued his work as a guardian of the Seth texts and continued to supervise the publication of some of the remaining material, including The Early Sessions, and making sure that all of the recordings, manuscripts, notes and drawings related to the extraordinary encounters with Seth would be given to the Yale Library. Butts remarried, and his second wife, Laurel Lee Davies, supported his work during the more than twenty years that they were together. (Davies had moved to Elmira from California in 1985 at Butts’ request to help answer mail and proofread manuscripts. They did not actually marry until 1999.) Butts died of cancer on May 26, 2008. Jane Roberts Butts and Robert F. Butts Jr. are interred together in the Wayne County, NY, Furnaceville cemetery; however, there is another gravestone with their names on it in the Sunnyside cemetery in Tunkhannock, PA. The vitality of the teachings they helped to bring to the world continues A number of groups have compiled anthologies of quotes from Seth, summarized sections of his teachings, issued copies of Seth sessions on audio tape, and further relayed the material via classes and conventions.

Reception and influence

Seth’s effect upon New Age thinkers has been profound. The title jacket of “The Nature of Personal Reality, A Seth Book” published in 1994 (Amber-Allen/New World Library) contains testimonials from some of the most notable thinkers and writers within the movement. Marianne Williamson, Deepak Chopra, Shakti Gawain, Dan Millman, Louise Hay, Richard Bach, and others express the effect the Seth Material had upon their own awakening. In words similar to Williamson’s they state: “Seth was one of my first metaphysical teachers. He remains a constant source of knowledge and inspiration in my life.” Catherine L. Albanese, professor of religious history at the University of Chicago, stated that in the 1970s the Seth Material “launched an era of nationwide awareness” of the channeling trend. She believes it contributed to the “self-identity of an emergent New Age movement and also augment[ed] its ranks.”

John P. Newport, in his study of the impact of New Age beliefs on contemporary culture, described the central focus of the Seth material as the idea that, for each individual: “you create your own reality”. (Briefly summarized, our beliefs generate emotions which trigger our memories and organize our associations. Eventually those beliefs become manifested in our physical lives and health.) Newport wrote that this foundational concept of the New Age movement was first developed in the “Seth Material”. Historian Robert C. Fuller, a professor of religious studies at Bradley University, wrote that Seth filled the role of guide for what Fuller called “unchurched American spirituality”, related to concepts of reincarnation, karma, free will, ancient metaphysical wisdom, and “Christ consciousness”.

Some writers noted, “Husband Robert Butts stated that similarities exist between Seth’s ideas and those of various religious, philosophical, and mystical doctrines from the Near, Middle, or Far East…. and we’ve done a little reading on Buddhism, Hinduism, Zen, and Taoism, for example, not to mention subjects like shamanism, voodooism, and obeah.”

The late amateur physicist Michael Talbot wrote, “To my great surprise—and slight annoyance—I found that Seth eloquently and lucidly articulated a view of reality that I had arrived at only after great effort and an extensive study of both paranormal phenomena and quantum physics.”

Criticism

Roberts and the Seth Material have attracted critiques from outside the paranormal community. The poet Charles Upton, in his collection of essays titled The System of Antichrist, posited that Roberts multiplied the self due to a fear of death. His opinion was that the Seth texts are based on a misunderstanding of both Christianity and of Eastern religions.

Professor of psychology and noted critic of parapsychology James E. Alcock opined, “In light of all this, the Seth materials must surely be viewed as less than ordinary. There certainly was the time and talent for fraud to play a role, but we cannot discriminate between that possibility and the possibility of unconscious production— At any rate, given these circumstances, there seems little need to consider the involvement of any supernatural agency.”

Seth’s teaching of a philosophy far more detailed than and not in keeping with traditional Church-authority, God-separate-from Creation, one-mortal-life, Jesus-centered messages has also received its share of criticism from some Christian believers. Various ministries have warned their members about the dangers and deceptions of reading channeled messages from Roberts and others. The Seth Material has been considered in certain circles to be “a book entirely written by a demon. A woman simply wrote it down as it was dictated to her by the demon; and, of course, it just destroys everything that is true in terms of God’s revelation” and as evidence for “Devil possession.” Videos such as Jane Roberts’ Seth Speaks is Anti-Catholic Hate Books – Allowed By The Media protested that Seth was “a demon from hell contacted through a ouija board.”

Since Roberts’ death, others have claimed to channel Seth. In the introduction to Seth’s first dictated book, Seth Speaks, “he” says, “communications will come exclusively through Ruburt [Seth’s name for Jane] at all times, to protect the integrity of the material”. In The Seth Material, Jane Roberts wrote: “Several people have told me that Seth communicated with them through automatic writing, but Seth denies any such contacts.” At least one person has claimed more recently to channel Roberts.

Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Roberts

Jan 13

Lobsang Rampa

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

three_eye

Lobsang Rampa is the pen name of an author who wrote books with paranormal and occult themes. His best known work is The Third Eye, published in Britain in 1956.

Following the publication of the book, newspapers reported that Rampa was Cyril Henry Hoskin (8 April 1910 – 25 January 1981), a plumber from Plympton in Devon who claimed that his body hosted the spirit of a Tibetan lama going by the name of Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, who is purported to have authored the books. The name Tuesday relates to a claim in The Third Eye that Tibetans are named after the day of the week on which they were born.

The Third Eye

In November 1956 a book called The Third Eye was published in the United Kingdom. It was written by a man named as Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, and it purported to relate his experiences while growing up in Chakpori Lamasery Chokpori, Tibet after being sent there at the age of seven. The title of the book is derived from an operation, similar to trepanation, that Rampa claimed he had undergone, in which a small hole was drilled into his forehead to arouse the third eye and enhance powers of clairvoyance. The book describes the operation as follows:

The instrument penetrated the bone. A very hard, clean sliver of wood had been treated by fire and herbs and was slid down so that it just entered the hole in my head. I felt a stinging, tickling sensation apparently in the bridge of my nose. It subsided and I became aware of subtle scents which I could not identify. Suddenly there was a blinding flash. For a moment the pain was intense. It diminished, died and was replaced by spirals of colour. As the projecting sliver was being bound into place so that it could not move, the Lama Mingyar Dondup turned to me and said: “You are now one of us, Lobsang. For the rest of your life you will see people as they are and not as they pretend to be.”

During the story, Rampa sees yetis and eventually encounters a mummified body of himself from an earlier incarnation. He also takes part in an initiation ceremony in which he learns that during its early history the Earth was struck by another planet, causing Tibet to become the mountain kingdom that it is today.

The manuscript of The Third Eye had been turned down by several leading British publishers before being accepted by Secker and Warburg for an advance of £800 (£17,000 today). Fredric Warburg of Secker and Warburg had met the book’s author, who at the time appeared in the guise of “Doctor Carl Kuon Suo”.

Intrigued by the writer’s personality, Warburg sent the manuscript to a number of scholars, several of whom expressed doubts about its authenticity. Nevertheless, the book was published in November 1956 and soon became a global bestseller. The Times Literary Supplement said of the book: “It came near to being a work of art.”

Controversy over authorship

Explorer and Tibetologist Heinrich Harrer was unconvinced about the book’s origins and hired a private detective from Liverpool named Clifford Burgess to investigate Rampa. The findings of Burgess’ investigation were published in the Daily Mail in February 1958. It was reported that the author of the book was a man named Cyril Henry Hoskin, who had been born in Plympton, Devon, in 1910 and was the son of a plumber. Hoskin had never been to Tibet and spoke no Tibetan. In 1948, he had legally changed his name to Carl Kuon Suo before adopting the name Lobsang Rampa. An obituary of Fra Andrew Bertie, Grand Master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, claims that he was involved in unmasking Lobsang Rampa as a West Country plumber.

Rampa was tracked by the British press to Howth, Ireland, and confronted with these allegations. He did not deny that he had been born as Cyril Hoskin, but claimed that his body was now occupied by the spirit of Lobsang Rampa.According to the account given in his third book, The Rampa Story, he had fallen out of a fir tree in his garden in Thames Ditton, Surrey, while attempting to photograph an owl. He was concussed and, on regaining his senses, had seen a Buddhist monk in saffron robes walking towards him. The monk spoke to him about Rampa taking over his body and Hoskin agreed, saying that he was dissatisfied with his current life. When Rampa’s original body became too worn out to continue, he took over Hoskin’s body in a process of transmigration of the soul.

Rampa maintained for the rest of his life that The Third Eye was a true story. In the foreword to the 1964 edition of the book, he wrote:

I am Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, that is my only name, now my legal name, and I answer to no other.

To Donald S. Lopez, Jr., an American Tibetologist, the books of Lobsang Rampa are “the works of an unemployed surgical fitter, the son of a plumber, seeking to support himself as a ghostwriter.”

Influence on Tibetologists’ callings

Donald S. Lopez, Jr., in Prisoners of Shangri-La (1998), points out that when discussing Rampa with other tibetologists and buddhologists in Europe, he found that The Third Eye was the first book many of them had read about Tibet; “For some it was a fascination with the world Rampa described that had led them to become professional scholars of Tibet.”

Lopez adds that when he gave The Third Eye to a class of his at the University of Michigan without telling them about its history, the “students were unanimous in their praise of the book, and despite six prior weeks of lectures and readings on Tibetan history and religion, […] they found it entirely credible and compelling, judging it more realistic than anything they had previously read about Tibet.”

Role in the Tibetan cause

Lobsang Rampa was a supporter of the Tibetan cause despite criticism of his books. In 1972, Rampa’s French language agent Alain Stanké wrote to the Dalai Lama and asked for his opinion about Rampa’s identity. He received a reply from the Dalai Lama’s deputy secretary stating “I wish to inform you that we do not place credence in the books written by the so-called Dr. T. Lobsang Rampa. His works are highly imaginative and fictional in nature.” The Dalai Lama had previously admitted that although the books were fictitious, they had created good publicity for Tibet.

Later career

Lobsang Rampa went on to write another 18 books containing a mixture of religious and occult material. One of the books, Living with the Lama, was described as being dictated to Rampa by his pet Siamese cat, Mrs Fifi Greywhiskers. Faced with repeated accusations from the British press that he was a charlatan and a con artist, Rampa went to live in Canada in the 1960s. He and his wife, San Ra’ab, became Canadian citizens in 1973, along with Sheelagh Rouse (Buttercup) who was his secretary and regarded by Rampa as his adopted daughter.

Lobsang Rampa died in Calgary on 25 January 1981, at the age of 70.

Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobsang_Rampa

Jul 25

Konstantin Raudive

Rob Hillstrom

Rob Hillstrom

Director / Chair Science at TEPI
Paranormal: Somewhat cliché but, my experiences began at a young age though I don’t recall making the “paranormal” association until the age of 9 when my grandmother died and returned for a visit. Through the years, I have given many phenomena more attention; from subtle dream images to apparent physical contact from “unseen” sources. I have been involved in independent research/study and investigation for about 30 years and began using some equipment about 20 years ago. I have been working with the Colorado based TEPI team since 2010. As a science oriented investigator, I am a bit of a contradiction. I believe the experience more so than the evidence. Simply because there can be many plausible explanations for most evidence. The experience on the other hand, can sometimes be very complex and difficult to explain easily. Professional: I have a Master of Science degree that essentially qualifies me to manage a multi-discipline team in their efforts to accomplish technical activities. (If I say more the MIB might show up.) My engineering background is primarily electronics but includes mechanical, astrophysics, and some aspects of thermal, optical, and audio. Previous careers were medical including paramedics and medical device technology (design, manufacturing, and training medical staff). I also dabbled heavily in photography before the wide spread use of digital imaging. Ideological: I was raised Presbyterian but allowed to find my own path. I studied Zen for a short time and explored many other faiths. In my late teens I attended a seminar on the subject of Quantum Physics and how it relates to our mind and consciousness; this was the turning point in my belief system. I did not become a scientific skeptic, I simply began to view nearly everything differently. I removed definitions I had learned and replaced them with relationships to my personal experiences and observations. Things once clearly defined as paranormal now had a plausible spin to them. Personal: In my spare time I write dark music, dark poetry, and horror/science fiction stories.
Rob Hillstrom

Latest posts by Rob Hillstrom (see all)

Source: Google Images

Source: Google Images

Konstantin Raudive Proponent of: ITC (Instrumental Trans-Communication) Born: April 30, 1909 – Latvia Died: September 2, 1974 – Germany Raudive was a writer who became involved in ITC related studies in 1964 after reading Voices From Space by Friedrich Jürgenson. Jürgenson wrote the book about his research into the phenomena he had discovered accidentally while attempting to record bird songs. Raudive worked with Jürgenson for a short time before continuing research on his own utilizing various techniques. Raudive worked with numerous researchers and engineers developing his technique and technology. An English translation of Raudive’s research was published in 1971 leading to Raudive being considered the person responsible for bringing “Raudive Voices” to the attention of the general public. The term “Electronic Voice Projection or Phenomena” may have first been used in a promotional article for Raudive’s book. Information Sources: http://latvianhistory.wordpress.com/2013/09/20/konstantins-raudive-the-latvian-who-discovered-the-electronic-voice-phenomenon/ http://www.skepdic.com/raudive.html http://www.psychicscience.org/evp.aspx http://atransc.org/circle/konstantin_raudive.htm

Feb 02

Silver RavenWolf

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

Silver RavenWolf, photo from her own website(from http://www.silverravenwolf.com/ index.php?folder=1)

Silver RavenWolf, photo from her own website(from http://www.silverravenwolf.com/
index.php?folder=1)

Silver RavenWolf (born September 11, 1956), born Jenine E. Trayer, is an American New Age, Magic and Witchcraft author and lecturer who focuses on Neo-Wicca.

Career

RavenWolf was a member of the Serpent Stone Family, and received her Third Degree Initiation as a member of that coven. She is the leader of the Black Forest Circle and Seminary, an organization containing several covens spanning the United States and Canada.

She has appeared as a lecturer and workshop facilitator at events in the Neo-Pagan community. She has been active in Wiccan anti-discrimination issues. She is also a Powwower, having adopted the Pennsylvania Dutch practice in a neo-Pagan context.

RavenWolf is the author of 17 books on Wicca and Paganism in general. She has also written several novels. Currently, her books have been translated into Czech, Spanish, Italian, German, Russian, Hungarian, Dutch and Portuguese. She is the director of the Wiccan/Pagan Press Alliance Midnight Drive.

Personal life

She is married and has four children. She currently resides in Dillsburg, Pennsylvania.

Taken from:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_RavenWolf

Jan 17

Israel Regardie

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

NPSGraphic

regardieIsrael Regardie (1907-1985) became infamous among the occultists of his day for breaking his oath of secrecy and publishing the order’s complete rituals in his book “The Golden Dawn”. Today this book is a classic best seller and has been revised and reissued several times. Overshadowed by his association with Crowley, much of Regardie’s work has been left unappreciated by those outside of the realms of high magic and occultism.

Francis Israel Regudie was born in England but emigrated to the United States with his family at age 13. Ritual magician, student of Aleister Crowley, and later a chiropractor who utilizes the thought of Wilhelm Reich in his work. Beginning in 1928 he traveled through Europe as Aleister Crowley’s lover, secretary and student. In 1934, after parting with Crowley, Regardie joined the Stella Matutina, a schismatic offshoot of the former Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Regardie eventually broke his vows of secrecy, and published the order’s rituals and magical teachings in 1937.

Despite his rationalizations, this act nearly destroyed both the Stella Matutina and the Alpha et Omega. In 1937, at the age of 30, Regardie returned to the U.S., entering Chiropractic College in New York. In addition, he studied psychoanalysis with Dr. E. Clegg and Dr. J. L. Bendit, and psychotherapy with Dr. Nandor Fodor. He opened a chiropractic office and taught psychiatry — Freudian, Reichian and Jungian — retiring in 1981 at the age of 74, when he moved to Sedona, AZ. He died from a heart attack in the presence of close friends during a dinner at a restaurant in Sedona, Arizona on March 10, 1985 at the age of 77.

The publications of Israel Regardie have recently engendered a host of modern, American groups on the Internet calling themselves “Golden Dawn,” but having no connection to the original Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, founded in Europe in 1888. In move to give themselves at least some veneer of legitimacy, certain Regardie-based groups have deliberately created a myth of a “Regardie Golden Dawn lineage.” Such a notion, however, is highly problematic.

Israel Regardie knew that he had no authority to initiate or grant a charter to anyone and honestly admitted this on numerous occasions, as for example in the attached letter. To begin with, Regardie was never even initiated in the Golden Dawn but rather only in the schismatic Stella Matutina, founded by former Golden Dawn Adept turned rogue, R.W. Felkin. Moreover, Regardie was never granted dispensation to initiate anyone by the G.H. Chiefs of the Stella Matutina and certainly had no authority to grant any sort of charter or even to consecrate a Vault of the Adepti.

Fully aware of these facts, Israel Regardie nonetheless did consecrate a Vault of the Adepti in 1982 in order to initiate his student, Cris Monnastre, into the Adeptus Minor (5=6) grade. These events provided fertile soil for a myth of a “Regardie Golden Dawn lineage” to be deliberately cultivated by certain Regardie-based groups following Regardie’s death. It should be noted that, in his life, Regardie only had four students. These were Cris Monnastre, William Kennedy, Larry Epperson, and Alan Miller (Christopher Hyatt). Regardie never endorsed any “Regardie-based” Golden Dawn group or order, although this imprimatur has been putatively claimed by a variety of organizations following his death.

One could potentially argue with some legitimacy that Israel Regardie has become the progenitor of his own occult school with its own lineage deriving exclusively from Israel Regardie, as is the case with numerous lineages deriving from teachers in Zen and Tibetan Buddhism in the East. In this limited sense, the Regardie-based groups could perhaps honestly claim a “Regardie lineage.” Dishonesty enters and public confusion arises, however, when Regardie-based groups deliberately attempt to conflate such a “Regardie lineage” with a “Golden Dawn” lineage, which by his own clear admission, was never Regardie’s to bestow.

http://www.golden-dawn.com/eu/displaycontent.aspx…

Jan 17

Wilhelm Reich

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

NPSGraphic

WILHELM REICH (1892-1957)
He was a quack psychiatrist, although he had an impressive pedigree, and had actually studied under Dr. Sigmund Freud himself. Reich claimed he discovered a new form of energy called “orgone”, and cited evidence of its existence. Reich claimed, for instance, if a you stare at the sky long enough, the ripples you see are the “orgone enregy”. In reality, doctors know the ripples are just an optical illusion due to eye strain, nothing more!

Orgone seemed to be the building blocks of the universe, and could also cure practically every disease, according to Reich. To date, no one has ever verified orgone’s existence, although Reich’s cult of followers continue to claim they have. In 1940 Reich invented a device that he claimed could cure everything from impotence to cancer called the “Orgone collector”…which was actually just an empty wooden box. Reich charged his clients around $250 per session of sitting in this phony miracle box. He also sold “Orgone blankets” and “Orgone pillows”, which also boasted curative powers, and were just ordinary blankets and pillows. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration obtained an injunction against Reich selling his products in 1954, but Reich defiantly continued to do so. In between Orgone research, Reich also claimed to have stopped a UFO invasion with a secret ray weapon he developed. You think the FDA would have been grateful to Reich for keeping us from being turned into pod people, but they still had him arrested. He died in Prison in 1957 for failing to obey a court order.
http://usminc.org/Paranormal/Famous/famous20.html
http://www.occultopedia.com/r/reich.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Reich

Jan 03

Grigory Yefimovich Nonykh Rasputin

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

NPSGraphic

raspGRIGORY YEFIMOVICH NONYKH RASPUTIN (1869-1916)
A Russian Orthodox Priest of the early 20th century who has been falsely accused of being an occultist by later writers. In his youth, Rasputin had been a sinner. Some writers have said his name means “debauched one”, but this isn’t so, and actually means “crossroads” (honestly, who would name their kid “debauched one”, anyway?) As an adult, Rasputin had a dramatic religious conversion while visiting a monastery and became a Priest. After a pilgrimage to Jerusalem that he made entirely on foot, Rasputin returned to Russia and settled in St. Petersburg. The “mad monk” Rasputin was very popular at the court of the last Czar of Russia, because he healed the Czar’s hemophiliac son through prayer.

In 1905, the Czar’s son Nicholas (a hemophiliac), was bleeding internally and was feared to be dying. When Rasputin began praying for the Czar’s son, he (or perhaps someone else) insisted the attending physician discontinue his treatments. This alone probably saved the child’s life, because the doctor was giving the child aspirin, which unbeknownst to him was compounding his hemophilia. No one at that time knew aspirin was a blood thinner.

Many nefarious claims have been made about Rasputin, and perhaps not all of them are undeserved, but he was not the monster with a hypnotic gaze later hack writers tried to turn him into. There were many temptations that came with his success, including alcohol and adultery, and if the Czar’s secret police can be believed (and that’s certainly a big “if”), he succumbed to them. His daughter Maria, wrote a biography of her father years after his death, and claims he was a pious man and dismisses the stories about him. Rasputin got involved in political intrigue and was in over his head. He was assassinated in 1916.

Occultists are fascinated by Rasputin, because of his alleged healing powers, and because he managed to become a favorite of the Romanov’s. Several theories have been made as to the source of his “powers”. One theory is that Rasputin belonged to a religious sect called the Khylsty, which practiced sex rituals, but historians conclude there is no evidence to support this idea. His daughter Maria also denied her father that he was a member of the sect in her biography of her father.

Occultists seem to think Rasputin had occult powers such as being able to read minds, but there doesn’t seem to be any evidence of this. Sophie Buxhoeveden, a friend of the Czarina, recounts how these stories came about:

“I believe that at this time the Empress saw Rasputin occasionally, but he was chiefly to be found in the company of the two Grand Duchesses who had ‘discovered’ him, and who now reported that Rasputin was undoubtedly a “seer.” This annoyed the Emperor, and, the next time he saw Rasputin, he asked him to tell him how he “saw ” . “Your Majesty, I know nothing of clairvoyancy,” said Rasputin.

“Then why have the Grand Duchesses asserted that you possess clairvoyant gifts?” replied the Emperor, crossly; and, when the Empress put the same question to Rasputin, she received the same reply” Buxhoeveden seemed to think the accusation of being a “seer” was done out of political reasons to discredit Rasputin. She also noted that “The commencement of endless intrigues dates from this period, as Elidor and Germogen were afraid that Rasputin would become more important than themselves.” ( from The Life and Tragedy of Alexandra Feodorovna by Sophie Buxhoeveden, Chapter V)

Occultists like Anton LaVey have tried to re-write history and make Rasputin into an occultist too…and even a Satanist no less. This is because they wish they could get close to people in power as Rasputin did with the Czar. But Rasputin was not an occultist, and all the wishful thinking will not change the past and make him into one. He didn’t have occult powers, and even if he lived sinfully, he still wasn’t a Satanist or occultist of any kind. The occult won’t give you sort of political power…or any power. Period.

http://usminc.org/Paranormal/Famous/famous13.html

Jan 03

Paschal Beverly Randolph

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

NPSGraphic

200px-Randolph-1Paschal Beverly Randolph (October 8, 1825 – July 29, 1875) was an American medical doctor, occultist, Spiritualist, trance medium, and writer. He is notable as perhaps the first person to introduce the principles of sex magic to North America, and, according to A. E. Waite, establishing the earliest known Rosicrucian order in the United States.

Biography
Randolph grew up in New York City. He was a free man of mixed-race ancestry, descendant of William Randolph. His father was a nephew of John Randolph of Roanoke and his mother was Flora Beverly, whom he later described as a woman of mixed English, French, German, Native American and Malagasy ancestry.This background led to his being a spokesman for the abolition of slavery. His mother died when he was young, leaving him homeless and penniless; he ran away to sea in order to support himself. A peripatetic man, he lived in many places, including New York state, New Orleans, San Francisco, and Toledo, Ohio. He married twice: his first wife was African-American, his second wife was Irish-American.

Early life
As a teen and young man, Randolph traveled widely, due to his work aboard sailing vessels. He journeyed to England, through Europe, and as far east as Persia, where his interest in mysticism and the occult led him to study with local practitioners of folk magic and varied religions. On these travels he also met and befriended occultists in England and Paris, France. Returning to New York City in September 1855, after “a long tour in Europe and Africa,” he gave a public lecture to African Americans on the subject of immigrating to India. Randolph thinks that “the Negro is destined to extinction” in the United States.

Career
After leaving the sea, Randolph embarked upon a public career as a lecturer and writer. By his mid-twenties, he regularly appeared on stage as a trance medium and advertised his services as a spiritual practitioner in magazines associated with Spiritualism. Like many Spiritualists of his era, he lectured in favor of the abolition of slavery; after emancipation, he taught literacy to freed slaves in New Orleans.

In addition to his work as a trance medium, Randolph trained as a doctor of medicine and wrote and published both fictional and instructive books based on his theories of health, sexuality, Spiritualism and occultism. He authored more than fifty works on magic and medicine, established an independent publishing company, and was an avid promoter of birth control during a time when it was largely against the law to mention this topic.

Having long used the pseudonym “The Rosicrucian” for his Spiritualist and occult writings, Randolph eventually founded the Fraternitas Rosae Crucis, the oldest Rosicrucian organization in the United States, which dates back to the era of the American Civil War. This group, still in existence, today avoids mention of Randolph’s interest in sex magic, but his magico-sexual theories and techniques formed the basis of much of the teachings of another occult fraternity, The Hermetic Brotherhood of Luxor, although it is not clear that Randolph himself was ever personally associated with the Brotherhood.

In 1851, Randolph made the acquaintance of Abraham Lincoln. Their friendship was close enough that, when Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, Randolph accompanied Lincoln’s funeral procession in a train to Springfield, Illinois. However, Randolph was asked to leave the train when some passengers objected to the presence of an African American in their midst.

Randolph was the principal of the Lloyd Garrison School in New Orleans when on October 14, 1865, he wrote to Garrison in Boston requesting assistance for his school.

Pre-Adamism
Randolph was a believer in pre-Adamism (the belief that humans existed on earth before the Biblical Adam) he wrote the book Pre-Adamite Man: demonstrating the existence of the human race upon the earth 100,000 thousand years ago! under the name of Griffin Lee in 1863. His book was a unique contribution towards pre-Adamism because it wasn’t strictly based on biblical grounds. Randolph used a wide range of sources to write his book from many different world traditions, esoterica and ancient religions. Randolph traveled to many countries of the world where he wrote different parts of his book. In the book Paschal claims that Adam was not the first man and that pre-Adamite men existed on all continents around the globe 35,000 years to 100,000 years ago. His book was different from many of the other writings from other pre-Adamite authors because in Randolph’s book he claims the pre-Adamites were civilised men while other pre-Adamite authors argued that the pre-Adamites were beasts or hominids.

Death
Randolph died in Toledo, Ohio, at the age of 49, under disputed circumstances. According to biographer Carl Edwin Lindgren, many questioned the newspaper article “By His Own Hand” that appeared in The Toledo Daily Blade. According to this article, Randolph had died from a self-inflicted wound to the head. However, many of his writings express his aversion to suicide. R. Swinburne Clymer, a later Supreme Master of the Fraternitas, stated that years after Randolph’s demise, in a death-bed confession, a former friend of Randolph had conceded that in a state of jealousy and temporary insanity, he had killed Randolph. Lucus County Probate Court records list the death as accidental. Randolph was succeeded as Supreme Grand Master of the Fraternitas, and in other titles, by his chosen successor Freeman B. Dowd.

In 1996, the biography Paschal Beverly Randolph: A Nineteenth-Century Black American Spiritualist, Rosicrucian, and Sex Magician by John Patrick Deveney and Franklin Rosemont was published.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paschal_Beverly_Randolph

Dec 21

Joseph Banks Rhine

111209-lg-rhinejb-1950sJoseph Banks Rhine (September 29, 1895-February 20, 1980) was the founder and director of the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University, often called the father of modern parapsychology. He believed that the limits of Extrasensory Perception would have to be established before any meaningful work could be done on the problem of Survival After Death, but he never lost a personal interest in the latter.

J.B. Rhine was born on September 29, 1895, in a log house in the Pennsylvania Mountains. From his childhood he heard many stories of omens, warnings and messages from the unseen agencies, although his skeptical father taught him to dismiss them as so much superstitions nonsense. When he was about 12, He had a religious experience and decided on a life in the ministry; he held this determination until he met Louisa Ella Weckesser, his future wife, whose critical attitude to religion gradually brought him to question his faith.

Rhine served in the Marines from 1917 to 1919. He and his wife Louisa were married in 1920. He began to study biology and plant physiology, preparing for a career in forestry. He received his Ph. D in botany form the University of Chicago in 1925; His wife had received her PhD in the same subject from the institution two years earlier. But Rhine did not find botany satisfying: more and more his mind turned to psychic experiences. The Rhines had heard Sir Arthur Conan Doyle lecture in Chicago in 1922, and his claim to be in touch with his deceased son made Rhine wonder whether psychical research might provide the way of establishing proof of a nonphysical world.

Rhine joined the American Society For Psychical Research in 1924 and in 1925 began to abstract foreign-language publications for the ASPR’s Journal. The Journal at this time was under the editorship of J. Malcolm Bird and was printing many stories of the Boston medium Margery. Joseph was enough impressed by what he read to want to conduct his own research with Margery. Boston was across the river from Cambridge and Harvard, where William McDougall, a prominent figure in psychical research. It was partly with the idea of investigating Margery that the Rhines left Morgantown in June 1926 and moved to Boston.

On July 1 the Rhines had a sitting with Margery which left Rhine badly disillusioned. He had seen the medium kick a megaphone within reach of her hand in the dark, and when he checked a balance after the Séance he found that the weight had been moved so that the “wrong” side would go down. He quickly wrote to the ASPR about what he had seen; later he resigned his membership in the society.

The Rhines had based their decision to leave Morgantown partly on a belief in Bird’s presentation of the mediumship, Louisa wrote in Something Hidden (1983), her book on their life together, but now suddenly everything was up in the air. They had reached Cambridge to find McDougall leaving for sabbatical, and the Crandon mediumship had turned to be a fraud. Fortunately, there was Walter Franklin Prince at the Boston Society For Psychic Research.

Prince had left his position as research officer with the ASPR partly because he too, was skeptical of the Crandon Mediumship. He arranged for the Rhines to have sittings with a mental Medium, Minnie Meserve Soule, on behalf of a Detroit school administrator, John F. Thomas, who was working on his doctorate under McDougall. Thomas, in turn, arranged for the Rhines to go to Duke University in the fall of 1927 to assist him in his data analysis. Duke had hired McDougall away from Harvard after his sabbatical.

Rhine at first worked as a research assistant to McDougall as well as Thomas. He stayed on to teach psychology after Thomas received his Ph. D, and in the fall of 1930 he and McDougall, along with others in psychology department, began the ESP experiments that would make the Parapsychology Laboratory world famous. The association with Prince now had another benefit Prince edited and the Boston Society published Rhine’s monograph Extra-Sensory Perception (1934), in which he reported the results of those early experiments.

The Soule sittings they had conducted for Thomas had been interesting, but the Rhines disagreed with Thomas had over their interpretation. Thomas believed that these and other of his séance communications were genuine messages from his deceased wife, whereas the Rhines thought they could be explained on the basis of the medium’s ESP. The debate was an old one, going back to the beginnings of the Society For Psychical Research (SPR) in London in 1882.

But Rhine had not lost his personal interest in the survival problem. In a series of books and lectures, as well as scientific papers and editorials published in the Journal of Parapsychology, which he founded at Duke in 1937, he was quick to point out that ESP supported a dualistic separation of body and mind. And if body and mind were separate, then in theory the mind should be able to survive the body’s death. Until the limits of ESP were established, however, he believed there was no scientific way of pursuing the survival problem.

The Parapsychology Laboratory continued in operation at Duke until Rhine’s retirement in 1965, when he moved it off campus to the new Foundation for Research on the Nature of Man, where it is still in existence. Rhine died on February 20, 1980, at his home in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

References

Berger, Authur S. Lives and Letters in American Parapsychology, Jefferson, N.C. :McFarland, 1988.

Brian, Dennis. The Enchanted Voyager: The Life of J. B. Rhine. Englewood Cliffs, N.J. : Prentice-Hall, 1982

Matlock, J.G. “Cat’s Paw: Margery and Rhines, 1926.” Journal of Parapsychology 51 (1987): 229-247

Mauskopf, Seymour, and Michael McVaugh. The Elusive Science. Baltimore: John Hopkins, 1980

Rhine, Louisa E. Something Hidden. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1983

Rao, K. R., ed. J. B. Rhine: On the Frontiers of Science. Jefferson, N.C., McFarland, 1982

Dec 03

Christian Rosenkreuz

Ashley Ann Lewis

Ashley Ann Lewis

Director / Dept Chair Occult at National Paranormal Society
Ashley became interested in the paranormal at a young age, but at that young age she did not have much understanding in it at all. I wasn’t until 2010 that she really became interested. Thanks to a Resolve carpet cleaning can that flew across the room, Ashley among three others who witness what happen that night, they pulled a team together. Ashley is a heavy researcher and though she may find the answer to what she is searching for she’ll search even harder. She’s overly determined and takes her part in the paranormal field very seriously. Between working hard and spending every dime she had she became a found of a paranormal team that is based out of Historic Louisiana and was honored to take on a position as a Representative with The National Paranormal Society. There is still so much she does not understand which drives her to work even harder and to further educate herself on everything.
Ashley Ann Lewis

Latest posts by Ashley Ann Lewis (see all)

crisChristian Rosenkreuz is the legendary, perhaps allegorical, founder of the Rosicrucian Order (Order of the Rose Cross), presented in the three Manifestos published in the early 17th century. The first anonymous public document on the Rosicrucian Order is the Fama Fraternitatis Rosae Crucis, which appeared in 1614 in Kassel (Germany), introducing the pilgrim founder “Frater C.R.C.”, followed in 1615 by with the Fama). In 1616, the Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz appeared in Strasbourg (annexed by France in 1681), losing for the first time the founder’s name as Christian Rosenkreutz.

Legend
According to legend, Christian Rosenkreuz was a doctor who discovered and learned esoteric wisdom on a pilgrimage to the Middle East among Turkish, Arab and Persian sages, possibly Sufi or Zoroastrian masters, supposedly in the early 15th century (see section below on Symbolism); returned and founded the “Fraternity of the Rose Cross” with himself (Frater C.R.C.) as Head of the Order. Under his direction a Temple, called Sanctus Spiritus, or “The House of the Holy Spirit”, was built.

It is described that his body was discovered by a Brother of the Order, in a perfect state of preservation, 120 years after his death (which occurred in absolute secrecy) — as Rosenkreuz had predicted —, in a heptagonal chamber erected by himself as a storehouse of knowledge.

It is described that on the Sarcophagus in the centre of the Crypt of Christian Rosenkreutz were written, among other inscriptions the words, “Jesus mihi omnia, nequaquam vacuum, libertas evangelii, dei intacta gloria, legis jugum” (being in translation, “Jesus is everything to me, by no means empty, the freedom of the gospel, the untouched glory of god, the yoke of the law”), testifying to the builder’s Christian character. Rosenkreuz’s crypt, according to the description presented in the legend, seems to be located in the interior parts of the Earth, recalling the alchemical motto V.I.T.R.I.O.L.: “Visita Interiora Terrae Rectificando Invenies Occultum Lapidem (“Visit the Interior Parts of the Earth; by Rectification Thou Shalt Find the Hidden Stone”).

Biographies
According to Maurice Magre (1877–1941) in his book Magicians, Seers, and Mystics, Christian Rosenkreuz was the last descendant of the Germelshausen, a German family which flourished in the 13th century. Their castle stood in the Thuringian Forest on the Border of Hesse and they had embraced Albigensian (i.e., Cathar) doctrines, combining Gnostic and Christian beliefs. The whole family was put to death by Konrad von Marburg except for the youngest son, who was only five years old. He was carried away secretly by a monk who was an Albigensian adept from Languedoc. The child was placed in a monastery which had already come under the influence of the Albigenses, where he was educated and made the acquaintance of the four other brothers who were later to be associated with him in the founding of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood. His account derives from oral tradition.

Some occultists including Rudolf Steiner, Max Heindel and (much later) Guy Ballard, have stated that Rosenkreuz later reappeared as the Count of St. Germain, a courtier, adventurer and alchemist who reportedly died on February 27, 1784. Steiner once identified Rembrandt’s painting “A Man in Armour” as a portrait of Christian Rosenkreuz, apparently in a 17th-century manifestation. Others believe Rosenkreuz to be a pseudonym for a more famous historical figure, usually Francis Bacon.

Symbolism of the numbers in the Manifestos
The legend presented in the Manifestos has been interpreted symbolically (as were all hermetic and alchemical texts of those times). They do not directly state Christian Rosenkreuz’s years of birth and death, but in two sentences in the second Manifesto the year 1378 is presented as being the birth year of “our Christian Father”, and it is stated that he lived for 106 years, which would mean he died in 1484.The foundation of the Order can be supposed in similar terms to have occurred in the year 1407. However, these numbers (and deduced years) are not taken literally by many students of occultism, who consider them to be allegorical and symbolic statements for the understanding of the Initiated. The justification for this relies on the Manifestos themselves: on the one hand, the Rosicrucians clearly adopted through the Manifestos the Pythagorean tradition of envisioning objects and ideas in terms of their numeric aspects, and, on the other hand, they directly state, “We speak unto you by parables, but would willingly bring you to the right, simple, easy and ingenuous exposition, understanding, declaration, and knowledge of all secrets.”

The metaphorical nature of these legends lends a nebulous quality to the origins of Rosicrucianism. The opening of Rosenkreuz’s tomb is thought to be a way of referring to the cycles in nature and to cosmic events; and as well, to the opening of new possibilities for mankind consequent on the advances of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Similarly, Rosenkreuz’s pilgrimage seems to refer to the transmutation steps of the Great Work.

Similar legends may be found in Wolfram von Eschenbach’s description of the Holy Grail as the “Lapis Exillis”, guarded by the Knights Templar, or in the Philosophers’ stone of the alchemists, the “Lapis Elixir”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Rosenkreuz

.