Tag Archive: nevada

Jan 05

Nevada Paranormal Task Force

 NPS-Default Contact Name Chuck Klenus
Location Las Vegas, NV
West Coast
Phone  702-883-0091
Email email
Website nevadaparanormaltaskforce.com
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Specialty:
Historic and Scientific. Our team is Historical. Scientific. We. Help those with Paranormal Activity. We cleanse, we also travel to haunted locations

Jun 18

Kurfman Paranormal Research Team

 NPS-Default Contact Name  Billy Kurfman
Location  Nevada, TX
Texas
Phone  469-500-7650
Email email
Website
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Specialty:
We are interested in studying and leading all aspects of the paranormal and help make contact for reasons to help positive entities and also help deal with and help with negative entities.

Feb 27

Lovelock Giants

Todd Wayne Knipple

Todd Wayne Knipple

I was awakened to the reality of the paranormal at the age of 12 while at a friend’s home. What happened that one night back in 1983 kept me awake for three days. After that incident I was left with many questions. My determination to find answers to what had happened that night became an obsession that would lead me down a path into investigating the paranormal. I found myself consumed by these strange anomalies that were captured on video, audio and photographs, and the strange feelings and sensations I would have from walking into old buildings or a person’s home.
For nearly 30 years, I have dedicated myself to finding these answers by using a scientific approach to fully understand and bring explanations to those who seek help and who are experiencing themselves the same things I experienced some 30 years ago. I can say that out of all of the cases I have investigated over the years as a paranormal investigator, 99% can be explained as a product of environment. There is, however, that 1% that can only be considered Beyond The Grave.
Todd Wayne Knipple

Latest posts by Todd Wayne Knipple (see all)

g1Lovelock Cave (NV-Ch-18) is a North American archaeological site previously known as Sunset Guano Cave, Horseshoe Cave, and Loud Site 18. The cave is about 150 feet long and 35 feet wide. Lovelock Cave is one of the most important classic sites of the Great Basin region because the conditions of the cave are conducive to the preservation of organic and inorganic material. The cave was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 24, 1984. It was the first major cave in the Great Basin to be excavated.

The large rock shelter is north of modern day Humboldt Sink. Lovelock Cave is in the Lake Lahontan region, next to the former lakebed of Lake Lahontan. It was formed by the lake’s currents and wave action. It was first a rock shelter. Eventually an earthquake collapsed the overhang of the mouth. Lake Lahontan was a large Pleistocene pluvial lake that covered much of western Nevada. Due to drier Holocene climate the water elevation dropped and much smaller lakes remain such as Humboldt Lake, Pyramid Lake, and Carson Lake. The dry environment of the cave resulted in a wealth of well-preserved artifacts that provide a glimpse on how people lived in the area. Lovelock Cave was in use as early as 2580 BC but was not intensely inhabited until around 1000 BC. People occupied Lovelock Cave for over 4,000 years. The initial discoveries of artifacts and excavations, in the early 20th century, were not very well executed, which resulted in a loss of archaeological information. However more recent investigations were more careful and meticulous. A wealth of knowledge pertaining to life on the Great Basin has come from this important site because many unique artifacts have been successfully recovered.

In 1911 two miners, David Pugh and James Hart, were hired to mine for bat guano from the cave to be used as fertilizer. They removed a layer of guano estimated to be three to six feet deep and weighing about 250 tons. Heizer and Napton’s review of the excavation states “the guano was dug up from the upper cave deposits, screened on the hillside outside the cave, and shipped to a fertilizer company in San Francisco.” Miners had dumped the top layers of Lovelock into a heap outside of the cave. The miners were aware of the artifacts but only the most interesting specimens were saved. Unfortunately, the first exploration was unsystematic and the loss of material and damage to the site strata was considerable in large portions of the cave. L.L. Loud of the Paleontology Department at the University of California was contacted by the mining company when the refuse left by the ancient people proved so plentiful that fertilizer could no longer be collected.

g2In the spring of 1912 A.L. Kroeber sent L. L. Loud, an employee of the Museum of Anthropology, University of California to recover any materials that remained from the guano mining of the previous year. Loud excavated Lovelock Cave for five months and reportedly collected roughly 10,000 material remains. The majority of the archaeological record was gathered from three areas: a dump outside the cave left by miners, lower level deposits from the northwest end of the cave, and undisturbed refuse along the outlying edges of the cave. Unfortunately, Loud did not maintain a comprehensive report of the excavation so detailed information is not available. The method and procedure of archaeological excavations has improved over the years and Loud’s excavation does not fit into the standards of today’s practices. He labeled the individual dig locations as “lots” without establishing any grid system. Grid systems are used to determine origin and depth of archaeological record. Loud recorded 41 lots. Heizer and Napton tried to further detail Loud’s findings but because Loud was not consistent with his methods of recording data their efforts were ineffective.

Twelve years after the first excavation Loud returned to Lovelock Cave with M.R. Harrington in the summer of 1924. The Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, New York commissioned Harrington and Loud, who, assisted by local Paiute Indians, attempted to recover any materials left from previous investigations. They found leftover fragments that had been ignored by collectors in the east end and center of the cave. The team also dug to the base of the deposits in the west end. This excavation resulted in the discovery of the famous duck decoy cache.

The American Museum of Natural History sponsored Nels Nelson to conduct a surface collection of Lovelock Cave in 1936. However, no archaeological material recovered was admitted to the museum’s collection.

Robert Heizer came to Lovelock Cave in 1949 to collect organic material for radiocarbon dating. He later returned in 1950 and 1965 with a field group to sift through the remains that the miners left behind in a slope in front of the cave and collect coprolites. In excavations with Lewis Napton during 1968 and 1969 disturbed human remains were discovered. The remains found were so scattered that a complete recovery was never possible. Human coprolites found at Lovelock Cave are instrumental in piecing together the cultures’ subsistence patterns, specifically the kinds of food the Indians were eating. Indians in the area were primarily eating birds, fish and other fauna that lived near the lake. They also collected and stored vegetation for winter months. Furthermore, because coprolites are organic material, they could be dated with the radiocarbon dating technique.

The most renowned discovery at Lovelock Cave was a cache of eleven duck decoys. M.R. Harrington and L.L. Loud found when they were digging for the Museum of the American Indian in 1924 in Pit 12, Lot 4. The cache included eight painted and feathered decoys and three unfinished decoys. Items found in the same pit consisted of feathers and two bundles of animal traps. The remarkable decoys were made from bundled tule, a long grass-like herb, covered in feathers and painted.

The first attempt to date the decoys with radiocarbon dating techniques in 1969 was unsuccessful because the material got lost. Later samples could not be acquired without causing extensive damage to the decoys so they were not dated until the development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) dating technique. Technological advances with AMS dating meant that much smaller, milligram-size, specimens from archaeological record were ample size for dating. Samples were retrieved from two duck decoys and A. J. T. Tull of the University of Arizona, Tucson conducted the dating of the specimens. In 1984 he reported the dates to Don D. Fowler. Duck Decoy 13/4513, Lovelock Cave was dated at 2,080 + 330 BP, and Duck Decoy 13/4512B was dated at 2,250 + 230BP.

A hand woven textile sling was collected by Loud in 1912 but it was not reported or studied extensively until years later. Archaeologists are interested in the specific specimen because it is recognized as one of the earliest slings in North America. The Indians of the Northern Paiute or Paviotso were occupants of the area during historic times and they recognized the sling as a toy or used for hunting and war. Slings were known to serve different purposes such as a toy, a forehead band, or a mechanism for hunting birds. The design of the sling found at Lovelock was constructed through a simple knotting technique from a two-ply yarn. The pattern on the sling is reversible. It was likely made from various pieces of available fiber. The sling found at Lovelock is just one of the many handmade textile items of the cave. Traps and nets were also crafted to assist hunters during their search for food. Baskets and other food storage items were used to ensure that during times of resource scarcity everyone would have enough food for survival.

Humans utilized the cave starting around 2580 BC but it was not intensively used until 1000 BC. Two competing hypotheses arose from the investigations of Lovelock Cave. Heizer and Napton supported a limnosedentary theory pertaining to life at the site. This view held that people of the area rarely moved from their base because they had access to such rich and varied resources. This theory is based on the coprolitic material found at Lovelock which revealed a primary diet of fish and diverse lakeside fare. A limnomobile view suggests that sites such as Lovelock were only occupied during certain times throughout the year and people in the area were very mobile. Lovelock Cave is believed to have been occupied extensively during the winter months. Summer months may have been plagued with insects that would make life near a marsh undesirable. The findings at the site reveal lengthy periods of occupation and also show the complicated techniques used by hunters and gatherers to acquire resources.

Lovelock Cave overlooks Humboldt Sink, a remnant of Lake Lahontan. The human coprolites recovered from Lovelock Cave reveal that 90 percent of the diet came from Humboldt Sink. All sizes of fish were eaten and hunting techniques included the use of nets, traps, and hooks made from fishbone. Dietary staples include: Lahontan Chub, ducks, and mudhens. Plants such as bulrush, cattail, and other grasses were also significant food sources. The environment of the Great Basin is very diverse. The amount of rainfall varies year to year. A wet year can potentially produce six times more vegetation than that of a dry year. Hunter-gatherers of the Great Basin survived on a wide variety of resources to adapt to a changing environment. The inhabitants of Lovelock Cave were fortunate to live around a rich lowland marsh, the duck and goose decoys were ideal for hunting in such areas. Mosquitoes and other insects were troublesome pests to people of the marshes during summer months.

Subsistence patterns and adaptations varied greatly among Great Basin groups. People living in mountainous areas were surviving on plants for more than fifty percent of their diets whereas people around water or in the marshes were hunting fish and other wetland wildlife. Waterfowl have been attracted to Great Basin marshes for thousands of years. Ancient hunter-gatherer inhabitants of Lovelock Cave became expert bird hunters. They used their well-designed duck decoys to lure prey then shoot birds from blinds. As hunters became more experienced they would wear disguises made from reeds or duck skin and stalk birds then surprise and grab them by the legs. The people at Lovelock recognized the importance of water fowl and utilized birds extensively. Archaeological specimens from the site show that the inhabitants collected feathers from geese, ducks, pelicans, and herons. Hunter-gathers were intelligent and used the feathers from the birds to create decoys which allowed the capture of more birds. Decoys are still used by local native people today in hunting water fowl.

Hunters were also able to rely on a variety of fauna such as muskrat, rabbit, and rodents as foodstuff. Gathers were harvesting vegetables and grasses in the spring and fall to supplement their rich diet. The women of the group were likely the gatherers and also responsible for crafting important items to make life easier in the marsh. Fibers from dogbane and milkweed were used to fashion yarns and baskets. Baskets were used to store food, especially vegetation that was harvested in the spring and fall to be saved for winter months. Women would occasionally collect fish with smaller baskets.

The ideal conditions at Lovelock Cave preserved deposits of feathers from various birds and textiles from nets. Common fibrous items include: nets, baskets, sandals, traps, and decoys. Manos and metates, hand held grinding stones, were abundantly used by Indians. They helped process plant foods especially seeds, nuts, and other tough material. The materials recovered from Lovelock Cave helped to demonstrate that hunting and gathering was the primary means of survival for Native Americans of the Great Basin for thousands of years. The diversity of resources allowed the people in the area to thrive using traditional methods for a long period of time, and whose material culture remained the same for thousands of years.

The cave’s last use is believed to be in the mid-1800s as indicated by a gun cache and a human coprolite. The material was tested through radiocarbon dating and dated to about 1850.

According to Paiute oral history, the Si-Te-Cah or Sai’i are a legendary tribe of red-haired cannibalistic giants. Mummified remains fitting the Paiute description were discovered by guano miners in Lovelock Cave in 1911. Adrienne Mayor writes about the Si-Te-Cah in her book, Legends of the First Americans. She suggests that the ‘giant’ interpretation of the skeletons from Lovelock Cave and other dry caves in Nevada was started by entrepreneurs setting up tourist displays and that the skeletons themselves were of normal size. However, about a hundred miles north of Lovelock there are plentiful fossils of mammoths and cave bears, and their large limb bones could easily be thought to be those of giants by an untrained observer. She also discusses the reddish hair, pointing out that hair pigment is not stable after death and that various factors such as temperature, soil, etc. can turn ancient very dark hair rusty red or orange.

Source:

http://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu/blm/lovelock.pdf

http://otherworldmystery.com/ancient-red-haired-giants-in-lovelock-nevada-usa

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovelock_Cave

http://www.sydhav.no/giants/lovelock.htm

Jan 28

Ghost Posse

ghostposse Contact Name  Petra Brandt
Location  Reno, Nevada
Phone  (775) 425-0892
Email email
Website www.ghostposse.com
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Specialty:
Residential and Business Paranormal Investigations, Cleansings. We provide fast courteous service and are always willing to travel, depending on your needs. We offer daytime re-con, and nightlong on-site investigations, with sleepovers optional on most appointments. All evidence gathered is looked over immediately, and carefully, and no information is expressed or shared with anyone without our/your approval. Your privacy is important to us, and is respected.

 

Dec 31

Battleborn Paranormal

battleborn Contact Name Daniel White
Location Reno Nevada
Phone (775) 440-4854
Email email
Website battlebornparanormal.webs.com
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Specialty:
Perform cleansings, blessings, Investigate

Oct 13

Flamingo Las Vegas Hotel & Casino

1404401578019 Address 3555 Las Vegas Blvd S
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109
Phone (800) 902-9929
Email
Website www.flamingolasvegas.com/
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Oct 13

Bellagio Las Vegas

1255475_10151545876602821_1458083045_n Address 3600 Las Vegas Blvd S
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109
Phone (800) 987-6667
Email
Website www.bellagio.com/
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Oct 13

Bally’s Las Vegas

599874_10151027559803060_2103546922_n Address 3645 Las Vegas Blvd S
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109
Phone (800) 634-3434
Email
Website www.ballyslasvegas.com/
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Oct 13

Hotel Nevada

10151300_1378342049101204_8635907601418195247_n Address 501 Aultman St
Ely, Nevada 89301
Phone (800) 406-3055
Email
Website hotelnevada.com/
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Oct 12

Bonnie Springs Ranch

544396_272006799547889_785008673_n Address 16395 Bonnie Springs Rd
Las Vegas, Nevada 89161
Phone (702) 875-4191
Email email
Website bonniesprings.com/
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Oct 12

Brewery Arts Center

528517_506744612685903_1377655656_n Address 449 W King St
Carson City, Nevada 89703
Phone (775) 883-1976
Email email
Website www.breweryarts.org/
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Oct 12

Silver Queen

423164_480132238711547_1216597125_n Address 28 “C” St North
Virginia City, Nevada 89440
Phone (855) 337-3030
Email email
Website www.silverqueenhotel.net/
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Oct 12

Mizpah Hotel

156761_434637283252386_1516224290_n Address 100 Main St
Tonopah, Nevada 89049
Phone (855) 337-3030
Email email
Website www.mizpahhotel.net/
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Oct 12

Planet Hollywood Resort

403417_10150993450057604_2038421213_n Address 3667 Las Vegas Blvd S
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109
Phone (886) 919-7472
Email
Website www.planethollywoodresort.com/
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Oct 12

St. Mary’s Art Center

1908243_530968480334755_1391742026_n Address 55 N R St
Virginia City, Nevada 89440
Phone (775) 847-7774
Email email
Website stmarysartcenter.org/
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Oct 11

The Washoe Club Museum

29080_123091924372871_1678516_n Address 112 S C St
Virginia City, Nevada 89440
Phone (775) 847-4467
Email email
Website www.thewashoeclub.com/
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Notes:
The 3 story Washoe Club was built in 1876 as a social club for affluent members of the community. It closed in 1897. Claims at this location include at least 4 different entites, apparitions. disembodied voices and sounds. The location does offer public tours daily. It also offers “lockdown” private investigations for a fee by appointment only. Please contact the location at the above number during business hours 12pm to 6pm to schedule private investigations.

Oct 11

Piper’s Opera House

524436_516053525109312_217820577_n Address B and Union Streets
Virginia City, Nevada 89440
Phone (775) 847-0433
Email email
Website
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Oct 11

Mackay Mansion

29204_126972163998536_5520601_n Address 291 S “D” St
Virginia City, Nevada 89440
Phone (775) 847-0373
Email email
Website www.uniquitiesmackaymansion.com/
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Oct 11

Gold Hill Hotel and Crown Point Restaurant

1014168_534046966642672_1598000558_n Address 1540 Main St
Virginia City, Nevada 89440
Phone (775) 847-0111
Email email
Website www.goldhillhotel.net/
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Nov 04

Empathic Paranormal

Empathic Paranormal Contact Name Richard St.Clair
Location Carson City, Lake Tahoe, Reno, Virginia City, Sierras
Phone (775) 881-8919
Email email
Website
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Specialty:
We do private investigations, large venues, Native American Cleansings and empowerment. I’am affiliated with the Washoe Club in Virginia Cityand give tours of the Haunted Building.

Aug 09

Team 3am Paranormal Research

Team 3am Paranormal Research Contact Name Paul Perez
Location Las Vegas, Nevada
Nevada, California
Phone 702-901-9685
Email email
Website team3amparanormalresearch.com
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Specialty:
Team 3am believes that a small team of highly trained, mature and experienced investigators is better suited for a thorough home or business investigation and best serves the client by being less invasive and more respectful of their homes and property.  We do not use occult, pagan, wiccan, satanic, or any other alternative ritualistic methods. We do not use spirit communication devices like ouija boards, séances or table tipping.
Other Social Media: https://plus.google.com/104179238898354679635/about
zp8497586rq

May 27

Ghostly Getaways

Ghostly Getaways Contact Name
Location Reno, Nevada
Phone
Email email
Website
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Specialty:
Not given
.